History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families

tIlSTORY OP1 TI'XAS.

Besides the above, the following were delegates
who failed to reach the convention in
time to sign the Declaration of Independence:
John J. Linn, from Victoria, born in Ireland
in 1802, and came to Texas in 1830; James
Kerr, from Jackson, born in Kentucky in
1790, and came to Texas in 1825; and Juan
Antonio Padilla, a Mexican from Victoria.
Also a few of those whose names arc given
in the table were not present at the signing.
On March 16 the convention adopted the
executive ordinance by which was constituted
the government ad interim of the Republic
of Texas.
The constitution of the Republic of Texas
was adopted at a late hour on the night of
the 17th, but was neither engrossed nor enrolled
for the signature of the members prior
to the adjournment next day. The secretary
was instructed to enroll it for presentation.
He took it to Nashville, Tennessee, where it
was published in one of the papers, from
which it was republished in a Cincinnati
paper, and from the latter copied into the
Texas Telegraph of August, that year, 1836,
this being its first publication in Texas. No
enrolled copy having been preserved, this
printed copy was recognized and adopted as
authentic, and became the "Constitution."
During the sitting of the convention General
Sam Houston took leave of the body in
order to take command of the army, then concentrating
at Gonzalez.
At eight o'clock on the evening of the 18th
of March, the convention assembled for the
last time. and elected David G. Burnett Piesident
ad interim of the Republic, and Lorenzo
de Zavala, a patriot Mexican exile, vice-President.
They also elected the members of the
cabinet, namely: Samuel P. Carson, Secretary
of State; Bailey Hardeman, Secretary of the
Treasury; Thomas J. Rusk, Secretary of

War; Robert Potter, Secretary of the Navy;
and David Thomas, Attorney-General.
At eleven o'clock the convention adjourned
s ine die.
THE FLAG OF THE LONE STAR.
It was once generally believed in Georgia,
that the Lone Star flag was the workmanship
of a Miss Troutman, of Crawford county, that
State, who afterward married a Mr. Pope of
Alabama; and that she presented the ainae to
a Georgia battalion commanded by Lieutenant-Colonel
Ward. It was of plain white silk,
bearing an azure star of five points on either
side. On one side was the inscription Liberty
or Death, and on the other side the appropriate
Latin motto, Ubi Liberta8s habitat, ibi
Nostra Patria est.
This flag was unfurled at Velasco January
8, 1836, and proudly floated on the breeze
from the same liberty pole with the first flag
of independence, which had just been brought
from Goliad by the valiant Captain William
Brown, who subsequently did such daring
service in the Texas navy. On the meeting
of the first Congress, the flag of the Lone
Star was adopted as the national flag of the
young republic.
But another authority denies the Georgian
belief, and insists that the first Lone Starflag
ever unfurled in Texas was presented by Mrs.
Sarah R. Dawson to a company of volunteers
raised in Harrisburg, Texas, in 1835, and
commanded by Captain Andrew Robinson.
The fag was a tri-colorof red, white and blue,
the star being white, five-pointed and set in a
ground of red.
FOREIGN RELATIONS.
The people of the. United States now felt
more free to assist, both morally and materially,
the young and struggling Republic of

f

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Lewis Publishing Company, publisher. History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families. Chicago. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29785/. Accessed July 10, 2014.