History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families

84ZIISTtikY OP TEXAS.

*

'Texas. This increased sympathy imninediately
began to find expression in public utterances,
and naturally the Texans, by way of sympathetic
response, began to talk up annexation
to our Union. In view of this general sympathy,
President Burnett, May 30, 1836, appointed
James Collingsworth and Peter W.
Grayson as cor mmissioners to proceed to
Washington and ask the friendly aid of our
Government in procuring from Mexico the
recognition of independence, and to endeavor
to obtain a like recor.miJcir from the United
States Govssriumnent itself, and also to state that
annexation to this Government would be acceptable.
The commissioners accordingly
presented these matters at Washington, but
as Congress had just adjourned, no action was
taken. President Jackson sent Henry M.
Morfit to Texas to inform himself and report
as to the military, political and civil condition
of the people there. He accordingly made
his report, stating that Texas had a population
of 58,500 souls, and expressing surprise
that that country had carried on a successful
war so long, against so great odds, at so little
expense. He estimated that the probable
total amount of her outstanding debts did not
exceed $1,250,000.
Gorostiza, the Mexican minister at Washington,
representing a displeased government,
maintained that the United States had violated
neutrality during the preceding struggle,
naming the instance of United States soldiers
fighting on Texas ground, etc.; but this was
explained by the United States officers on the
ground that they were only fighting hostile
Indians, who had invaded our territory, excepting
that General Gaines at one time occupied
Nacogdoches, and at another took Fort
Parker, on the head-waters of the Navasota.
The admissions at the conclusion of the
above statement were enough for Gorostiza.

Ile repeated his representations, and, not satisfied
with the assurance of our Government,
-that the measures adopted were of a temporary
and purely defensive character,-declared
his mission at an end, October 15, and
left for home. Thus ended diplomatic relations
between the two countries.
By .uly the Texan army had increased to
2,300 men, and the commissioners-Austin,
Archer and Wharton-returned from Washington,
reporting that they had aroused much
sympathy in the United States. On the 23d
of this month, assured of tranquillity for a
tine by internal dissensions in Mexico, President
Burnett issued a proclamation for the
election of president, vice-president and senators
and representatives in Congress, on the
first Monday in October. The election officers
were also requested to obtain from each'
voter his sentiment as to constitutional
amendments and annexation to the United
States.
For the presidency three candidates were
noininated,--Stephen F. Austin, Sam Houston
and Henry Smith, late governor. Houston
at first declined, but as the other two candidates
represented factions, it was finally
decided that he, being neutral as to them,
should be retained as a candidate; and he was
elected by a large majority. Mirabeau B.
Lamar was- elected vice-president. The constitution
already drafted was adopted almost
unanimously, as also the proposition of annexation.

EARLY LEGISLATION.

The first Texan Congress met at Colombia
October 3, and the following day President
Burnett delivered his message, a long document,
describing particularly the deficiency
of their army and navy, the judicial system,
etc. After endeavoring to his utmost to onm

64

Alls-lbbfiP Or) TEXAS.

.

Lewis Publishing Company, publisher. History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families. Chicago. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29785/. Accessed July 25, 2014.