History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families

66 ilh9TO&Y OF TEXAS.~~~~~~~~~~~~~-~

fftr gun sloop of war, two armed steam vessels
and two eleven-gun schooners. Rules
and articles were established for the government
of the army and navy, the army to be
reorganized by the president; measures were
adopted for the protection of the frontier and
for the national defense by the organization
of militia; courts were also established, and
their powers defined; revenue provided for
by import duties; salaries of the government
officers established, and a general post office
and land office created. A national seal and
standard for the Republic were adopted. The
seal consisted of a single star, with the letters
REPUBLIC OF TEXAS in a circular line on the
seal, which also was circular. The national
flag was to have an azure ground, with a large
golden star central.
This first congress also chartered a gigantic
company, called the Texas Railroad, Navigation
& Banking Company, with a capital
stock of $5,000,000, etc.; but this met with
considerable opposition, and the company,
not being able to raise the million dollars required
for their bank, went down.
The boundary line of the young republic
was thus defined by this congress: From the
mouth of the Sabine to the mouth of the Rio
Grande, thence up the principal stream of
the latter to its source, thence due north to
the forty-second degree of latitude, and thence
along the boundary line as defined in the
treaty between the United States and Spain,
to the beginning. But this line included the
greater and best portion of New Mexico, to
which Texas had no right, and she had afterward
to recede from it.
At the opening of the new year the pecuniary
situation of Texas was very gloomy.
Although the country was temporarily relieved
from invasion, it was still threatened
by the old enemy. In respect to agriculture.

it had somewhat recovered from the widespread
desolation brought upon it by the
wars and unfriendly legislation of the old
government, but still much land remained
abandoned, and the people were all poor.
The army was in good condition, but not the
navy. Outside encouragement, however, began
to be manifest. It was morally certain
not only that the struggling republic would
soon be recognized as a nation by the United
States, but that also from this country there
would pour forth a stronger emigration to
the new-born land. Of course, no public
measure can be adopted without its bearing
hard on some parties, but these hardships are
seldom as great as feared. Some Northerners
objected to the annexation of Texas to the
old Union because it was spreading slave
territory; others, because their trade would
be interfered with by a new application of the
tariff laws, etc. President Jackson himself
was personally in favor of recognizing Texan
independence, but as president he made the
following statement: " Prudence therefore
seems to dictate that we should still stand
aloof and maintain our present attitude, if
not until Mexico itself or one of the great
foreign powers shall recognize the independence
of the new government, at least until
the lapse of time or the course of human
events shall have proved, beyond cavil or
dispute, the ability of the people of that
country to maintain their separate sovereignty
and to uphold the government constituted by
them." The senate of the United States, on
March 1, 1837, passed a resolution recognizing
the independence of Texas, but negotiations
for annexation were not listened. to by
the government. But soon afterward the Texan
minister was recognized at Washington, and
Alcee Labranche was appointed by the preident
as charge. d'affaires to the new republic,

66

RISTOAY~ OP TEXAS.

Lewis Publishing Company, publisher. History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families. Chicago. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29785/. Accessed July 26, 2014.