History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families

69

HISTORY OF TEXAS.

the public finances, with the prospect that
immigration and the increased interest taken
in Texan securities by persons in the United
States, the way out of their difficulties would
be found in due time.
By the constitution the term of office of
the president was limited to two years, without
his being eligible for re-election; succeeding
presidents were to hold their office
for three years. Consequently Houston's
term expired on the first Monday in December,
1838. The election was held in September,
the candidates being Mirabean B.
Lamar, Peter W. Grayson, James Collingsworth
and Robert Wilson; but before
the election Grayson and Collingsworth both
committed suicide! Lamar was chosen president
almost unanimously, an( David (G.
Burnett, vice-president.
In his inaugural address Lamar opposed
annexation to the United States very decidedly,
claiming that such an act would be .* the
grave of all her hopes of happiness and great
ness." In his message, which was a long
one, he urged the speedy adoption of a systemn
of public education, the promotion of a
general diffusion of knowledge and industry
by the appropriation of lands for educational
purposes and the establishment of a university;
and he also recommended reform in the
municipal code. He advocated severe measures
against the hostile Indians, considering
that they had broken their treaties, and that
the whites were therefore under no further
obligation to observe them. With regard to
the savages, "extinction or expulsion" was
his policy. For the protection of the frontier
he proposed the establishment of a line
of military posts, and, as a general protection
against Mexico, the organization of a
militia and the encouragement of volunteer
associations. While he was a free-trader in

the abstract, in view of the financial distress
of the Republic, lie recommended a continuance
of the tariff system then in vogue for a
short time longer, in order to mlaintain the,
good credit of the country.
But with all that Texas could do, hler delbt
friglitfully increased. ()Oie historian says
that during ti.e three years of Lamar's admlinistration
the public debt increased from
$1,887,526 to $7,300,000, and that the securities
decreased from 65 and 85 to 15 and
20 cents; but, according to ex-President
Houston's subsequent report. matters were
not quite so bad as that. (Treat allowune
had to be made for the peculiarity of the situation.

A REBELLION.
During tile latter part of 1838 the Nacogdoches
rebellion occurred, whven a considerable
number of Mexican settlers assembled
on tlhe banks of the Angelina, with 300 Indians,
under the leadership of Nathaniel
Norris, Vicente Cordova, and others. Their
numbers soon increased. President IHouston,
who was then at Nacogdoches, received
a communication from these leaders, disclaiming
allegiance to Texas. The malcontents
then directed their march to the Cherokee
nation. President Houston sent out
General Rusk, with the main body of the
army, to the headquarters of Bowles, the
Cherokee chief, while Major Augustin, with
150 men, followed the trail of the mnalcontents.
Rusk presently discovered that the
Mexican leaders had gone to the head-waters
of the Trinity river, his followers had dispersed
and many of them returned to their
homes without any blood being shed. Thie
precise object of this attempt at revolution
has never been fully explained. Coidova

Lewis Publishing Company, publisher. History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families. Chicago. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29785/. Accessed July 11, 2014.