History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families

HISTORY OP TEXAS.

had been in correspondence with the enemy
at Matamoras, and appears to have held a
commission from Filisola to raise the Ind'ans
as auxiliaries to the Mexican army. Early
in 1839, Filisola was succeeded by General
Canalizo, who, February 27, issued instructions
to the captains and chiefs of the friendly
nations, inciting then to wage incessant war
against Texas, and laying down a plan of
campaign for their guidance. He said that
Mexico was engaged in a war with France,
and could not at the time resume operations
against the revolted province; but the
friendly tribes had it in their power to prevent
the enemy from taking advantage of
fortunate circumstances. They were, however,
caiut;on^d not to advance too near the
frontier of the United States, but should occupy
the lines of San Antonio de Bejar
about tle Guadalupe, and from the heads of
the San Marcos to its mouth. This position
would have the advantage of keeping
the enemy in front and a friendly nation in
the rear, besides cutting off the enemy's
commneree with the interior of Mexico, and
furnishing abundant spoil. They were "not
to cease" to harass the enemy for a single
day, to burn their habitations, lay waste their
fields and prevent then from assembling in
great numbers, by rapid and well concerted
efforts. In case they should succeed in uniting
in a considerable number, they were to
be harassed day and night, and operations to
be directed with the greatest vigor against
distant points. Manuel Flores was appointed
commissioner to the Indians, to operate with
them as allies, and also to enlist the services
of Cordova.
But the best-laid scheme of -this man went
" agley;"' for as Flores was passing through
Texas with about twenty-five Mexicans and
Indians, he was taken by a Te:an force under

James 0. Rice and killed. Flores' men had
committed several murders; and in the engagement,
which occurred about fifteen miles
from Austin, the men were put to flight.
The correspondence with reference to the enlistmnent
of the Indians and Cordova thus fell
into the hands of the Texans and the plot
was made known.
THE INDIANS.
The Texan government then resolved to
remove the Cherokees, upon whose rich and
beautiful lands the whites were constantly
encroaching. Accordingly, Colonel Burleson,
from the Colorado, Colonel Landrum,
with his regiment from eastern Texas, and
General Rusk, with the Nacogdoches regiment,
were ordered to invade the territory.
The whole force, about 500 mein, was placed
under the command of General Douglass.
Negotiations for the peaceable removal of
the tribe to Arkansas having failed, on July
15, Douglass advanced against the Indian
camp, on arriving at which he found that the
Indians had retreated higher up the- river.
He found them, about 800 strong, and a running
fight with them for several days drove
them from their lands. Their crops were
also destroyed, with the idea that they were
being raised in order to co-operate with the
Mexicans. A few of the expelled owners,
however, did not leave the country, but remained
along the Colorado and continued to
harass the settlers.
But the most hostile and troublesome Indians
were the Comanches. In February,
1840, showing a disposition to enter into a
treaty of peace, twelve of their principal
chiefs met, March 19, the Texan commissioners
at Bejar, where General It. D. MeLeod
was in command. It was known that the
Comaunches bad thirteen white captives in

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Lewis Publishing Company, publisher. History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families. Chicago. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29785/. Accessed March 6, 2015.