History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families

H O T

and the whole conception and aim seems to
have been to meet the practical demands of a
progressive and cultured people. Wherever
it was practicable Texas material has been
used in the building, and the fact that nearly
all the material used is native, is an illustration
of the wonderful and varied resources of
Texas. Besides the granite a vast amount
of other material, including stone, lime, wood,
brick, etc., and many other articles, were
secured in Texas, so that it may be said the
State house is built for Texas land, out of
Texas material."
RECOGNITION BY FOREIGN POWERS.
During the first presidency of Mr. Houston,
General J. P. Henderson was sent to
London and Paris to obtain an acknowledgmnent
from those countries of Texan indeI)endence;
and from the first the British
government was favorably disposed, on account
of Texas being an agricultural country
and the people inclined to free trade, thus
opening new channels for English commerce.
France, indeed, recognized the independence
of Texas in 1839, but this friendly relation
was soon interrupted by a ridiculous affair
until some time in 1842. Holland and Belgium
recognized it in 1840, and England in
1841. But all the efforts made to obtain a
like recognition from Mexico failed. In this
connection the following passage from Bancroft's
history will be appropriate:
"In 1839 the Texan government, entertaining
some expectation that Mexico would
be inclined to listen to proposals for
peace, sent Bernard E. Bee as diplomatic
agent to that government. Bee arrived at
Vera Cruz in May, where he remained ten
days, pending the decision of the government
with regard to his reception. He was court

eonsly treated by General Victoria, Governor
of Vera Cruz, during his stay in that city.
The Mexican authorities finally decided not
to receive him, and he emlnbarked for Havana.
Texas, however, had a secret agent in the
Mexican capital, who, in 1840, under the
auspices of Pa.kenham, the English minister
in that city, succeeded in submnitting to the
government the basis of a treaty of peace.
Packenham, moreover, offered to act as mediator.
The treaty and the offer were alike
rejected by Mexico. In 1841 the British
government, without waiting for the exchange
of ratifications of the mediation convention,
officially instructed Packenham to
bring before the Mexican authorities the
proffer of Great Britain to mediate between
that power and Texas; and Mr. Burnley,
provided with a letter of introduction to him
from Lord Palmerston, proceeded to Mexico
as negotiator on the part of Texas. James
Webb also was sent from Texas as commissioner
to open and conduct the negotiations;
but he was not receive], and immediately
returned. Mexico paid no more heed to the
British nation than she had done to her
diplomatic agent. She unhesitatingly declinied
any such mediation, refused to entertain
the question of peace unless Texas re
signed her claim to independent sovereignty,
and prepared for war."
PRESIDENTS LAMAR'S AND HOUSTON'S ADMINISTRATIONS.

The presidential' election of September,
1841, resulted in the choice of Sam Houston
again, by a vote of 7,915 votes against 3,616
for David G. Burnett. Edward Burleson
was elected vice-prt sident. against Mennic.mi
Hlunt, with a much smaller majority.
When congress met in November, Lamar

73

HISTRY F TXAS

Lewis Publishing Company, publisher. History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families. Chicago. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29785/. Accessed September 18, 2014.