History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families

772I. HISTORY OF TEXAS.

troops came across the river and took charge
of the prisoners, as well as the money.
Captain Young had received $60 in gold
and $25 in silver for his services, and just at
the time when General Brown's troops came
he placed $5 more in his pockets. and thinks
he could easily have obtained all hd could
carry. There were fifteen wagons (with from
four to six mules attached) filled with gold
and silver, and all lying on the ground. The
prisoners were finally taken to the city and
discharged, and three days later the officers,
numbering 100 in all, placed themselves under
the direct order of General Gabriel, and
traveled to Tennessee, where they separated.
Captain Young finally reached home, after
many escapes from death from bushwhacking
parties still in the country. He then
returned to the place of surrender, as the
United States officer in command had signified
his willingness to turn over all the
horses captured and retained that could be
identified by the Captain or officers in cominand
of the company at the time of the
surrender. Captain Young recognized sixty
head, for which he received protection papers,
and returned them to the men of his company.
For this act he received many heartfelt
blessings from men, as well as their
families.
After the war was fully over our subject
returned to Alabama, where he remained
until 1867, and in that year came on horseback
from Enterprise, Mississippi, to Bastrop
connty, Texas, landing August 23, 1867.
At that time he had a horse, bridle, saddle
and $5 in money. He immediately engaged
in agricultural pursuits on the place where
he still resides, a part of which belonged to
his wife. Captain Young now owns 130
acres, with 100 acres in pasture and 100
acres of timber land. In December, 1868,

he was married to Mrs. 0. E. Trigg, a
daughter of David Arnett, of Franklin
county, Tennessee. By her first marriage
Mrs. Young had five children-Mary A.,
now Mrs. W. L. Morris; Della B., wife of
James H. Craft; Bettie, wife of Robert
Price; Nellie, now Mrs. C. Jenkins, and
William A. Mr. and Mrs. Davis have had
four children, only one now living-John T.,
who was married in 1887, to Miss Annie
Pierce, a native of this county. Our subject
and wife are members of the Missionary
Baptist Church. Mr. Young also affiliates
with the A. F. & A. M., Gamble Lodge, No.
491, and Bastrop Chapter, No. 95.
G APTAIN J. C. S. MORROW, a commercial
traveler of Georgetown, was
born in Woodford county, Kentucky,
November 20, 1839, a son of Preston B. and
Elizabeth (Hall) Morrow, natives also of Kentucky.
The father was formerly a merchant
at Versailles, that State, and at the time of
his death was employed as a trader. He
served as Police Judge for many years, having
been first appointed by the Federal authorities
and afterward elected to the office;
was one of twenty in his county of uncompromising
Union proclivities; and, although
a pro-slavery man, approved the emancipation
proclamation and was a Henry Clay Whig.
He was a conscientious Christian, and a Ruling
Elder in the Presbyterian Church for
many years. Mr. Morrow was three times
married, first to the mother of our subject,
next to Miss Davis, who lived but a few
months after her marriage, and his third wife
survived him about two years. His death
occurred February 1, 1875, at the age of
sixty-six years, and his first wife died in 1848,

772 &

-H-18-ORY P EXS

Lewis Publishing Company, publisher. History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families. Chicago. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29785/. Accessed October 30, 2014.