History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families

HISTORY OF TEXAS.

rather than with the aid of the United States
and France, and her motives were supposed
to be selfish.
TEXAS ANNEXED TO THE UNITED STATES.
The Texas presidential election of September,
1844, resulted in a victory for the antiannexationists,
being a choice of Anson Jones
for president, who was known to be opposed
to annexation. Kenneth L. Anderson was
chosen vice-president. Edward Burleson was
the defeated candidate for the presidency.
Houston, in his farewell message, gave a very
cheerful view of political affairs. But, being
yet weak, Texas was in fact only a shuttlecock
for the stronger powers. Houston, by
his pacific policy, had brought the Indians to
terms of peace, and by his economical administration
had improved the financial condition
of the republic, while in agricultural
and commercial respects Texas began to
thrive. In his inaugural address President
Jones said that his policy would be the maintenance
of the public credit; the reduction of
the expenses of government; the abolishment
of paper issues; the revision of the tariff law;
the establishment of public schools; the
speedy attainment of peace with Mexico, and
just and friendly relations with the Indians;
the introduction of the penitentiary system;
and the encouragement of internal improvement.
Not a word did he say with reference
. to annexation.
But annexation loomed up so rapidly that
Jones' administration was destined to be
short. February 28, 1845, only three months
after his inauguration, the United States
Congress passed a joint resolution in favor
of incorporating Texas into the Union. May
5th, President Jones proclaimed an election of
delegates to a coi vention to consider the adop

tion of the proposition of the United States,
and, meeting at A ustin, July 4, they recommended
annexation, and submitted to a popular
vote the proposition of the United States
Congress, along with a proposed State constitution,
which, on October 13, were ratified
by a vote almost unanimous! February 19,
1846, President Jones surrendered the executive
authority to the newly elected Governor,
J. Pinckney Henderson, who was inaugurated
February 16, 1846. Thus the lone
star of Texas became one of a glorious constellation.

TO ARMS.
Of course, this act of annexation meant
war with Mexico on a larger scale than ever.
In Texas, at this time, there were probably
about 75,000 inhabitants, about 4,000 of
whom were Mexicans. The nationality of
the new State was very composite. As to the
criminal element, there was no more of that
than in any frontier settlements, which generally
have a class of ruffians that disappear
on the approach of more settled civilization.
When the resolution of Congress in favor
of annexation was published, March 7, 1845,
General Almonte, the Mexican minister at
Washington, demanded his passports. War
with Mexico, indeed, the Government had
been preparing for, and General Zachary
Taylor was ordered to move from the Sabine
with a strong force to Corpus Christi, at the
mouth of the Nueces, at the end of June,
1845. In the meantime the Mexicans, too,
had been preparing for the contest) establishing
their first base at Matamoras. We have.
not space here to give a full account of the
", Mexican war," but let ns be content with a
tabular view of the principal battle, etmo
which, in general, is more satisfactory fr
reference than an extended account:

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Lewis Publishing Company, publisher. History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families. Chicago. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29785/. Accessed December 28, 2014.