History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families

HISTORY OF TEXAS.

Mexicans. This little army was made up of
snch men as Mr. Wells, and they followed
their leader, General Houston, with no
thought other than victory. It is such men
that gained for Texas her independence and
made her a Republic. It is such men as
these that have made Texas the greatest State
in the Union which constitutes the grandest
nation on the face of the earth, and the posterity
of these men will look back over the
history of Texas with pride in the knowledge
that their forefathers were the ones who so
nobly fought and bled that they might lay
the foundation of a commonwealth of peaceful
and happy homes, which their posterity
now enjoy. Too much cannot be said in
honor of the veterans of San Jacinto. They
will live in the memory of their posterity as
well as in that of the newer comers, who are
enabled to enjoy the fruits of their courage
and valor.
Besides serving in the Texas and Mexican
wars, Mr. Wells subsequently took an active
part in all the Indian wars, and his extensive
knowledge of the frontier aided the settlers
materially in keeping the savages at bay.
The early record of his life having been
omitted, it is now inserted. Mr. Wells was
born in Lincoln county, Tennessee, May 11,
1815, and was the oldest son of Martin and
Sally (Boyd) Wells, both natives of the same
Stat. and county. When he was two years
of age his parents removed to Marengo
county, Alabama, where his father followed
agricultural pursuits until the latter emigrated
to Texas in 1826. As previously
stated, Wayman lived at home with his
father until the outbreak of the Texas and
Mexican war, which lie entered at the age of
nineteen. After the war Wayman returned
home, where, during the same year, 1836,
his fatal er died, leaving the care of the family

and farm to him. The family consisted of
five sons and three daughters, two daughters
being then married.
He efficiently continued the management
of the homestead until 1855, at which time
he removed to Travis county. He there first
purchased 1,800 acres on Walnut creek, to
which he afterward added 160 acres more,
and subsequently bought 175 acres of timber
land. He was here extensively engaged in
farming and stock-raising until his death.
Besides his large landed estate and extensive
stock business Mr. Wells owned numerous
slaves, of which latter property he was deprived
through the result of the late war.
Not being discouraged by the loss of his
property, however, he pushed on, and being
a shrewd trader he continued to increase the
value of his property, and at the time of his
death was considered one of the wealthy men
of his section of Texas.
March 4, 1848, Mr. Wells was married to
Miss Mary E. Bacon, native of Tennessee,
born in Washington county, October 30,
1817. Her parents, Thomas and Julia Ann
(Harderman) Bacon, were both natives of the
same county as herself, where they were married,
and whence they emigrated, in 1835, to
Texas. They first settled in San Augustine
county, but in 1839 removed to Wells prairie,
Bastrop county, and afterward to Travis
county, where Mr. Bacon died in 1851, and
Mrs. Bacon in 1859.
Were but simple justice to be done to the
memory of the subject of this review, it
would be most consonant that more particular
attention be directed to those noble characteristics
which were a dominating power
in his life and which animated his every
action during the long years which were a
power for good to the extent of their duration.
He maintained a lively interest in all that

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776
m,

Lewis Publishing Company, publisher. History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families. Chicago. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29785/. Accessed December 27, 2014.