History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families

HiSTORY OF TEXAS. ml

stood high as a practitioner, business man,
Christian and gentleman. His wife died in
1888, aged sixty-nine years, they having
lived together forty-nine years and eleven
months. Dr. and Mrs. Anderson were the
parents of three children, viz: Edwin R.,
our subject; Helen H., deceased in 1880,
was the wife of J. M. Page, and Lucy H.,
wife of Mr. Shultz.
Edwin R. Anderson, the subject of this
sketch, is engaged in carpentering and farming,
and also in the bredng of Jersey stock.
He owns a ranch near Taylor, Texas, where
he has about seventy head. He has assisted
in the erection of several buildings, and
although still in the prime of life is classed
among the pioneers, having spent over fortyfive
years of his life in the county. Mr.
Anderson was married in 1869, to Miss
Elizabeth Talbert, a daughter of R. E. Talbert,
a resident of Williamson county. She
came with her parents from Louisiana in
1853, when five years of age. To this union
has been born one child-Cora Bell. Mrs.
Anderson is a member of the Old School
Presbyterian Church. Socially, our subject
is a member of the Woodmen of the World,
and politically, affiliates with the Republican
party.
WEN HIGGINS HOLMAN, a successful
farmer and respected citizen of
Travis county, Texas, residing near
Watters, has done as much as any other one
man of his community to advance the agricultural
interest of the vicinity, and he thus
is entitled to the prominence and prosperity
he now enjoys.
The Holman family is of German descent.
The paternal grandparents of the subject of

this sketch, James S. and Martha W. Iolman,
were natives of Tennessee, but settled
in Texas in 1856. The grandfather followed
railroading and died of yellow fever at Bryan.
His son, Willis M. Holman, and father of
the subject of this notice, was. born in Tennessee,
July 2, 1834. In January of 1856,
he was married to Miss M. D. Higgins, also
a native of Tennessee, where she was born
July 17, 1833. Her parents, 0. W. and F.
L. Higgins, were natives of Kentucky and
Virginia, respectively. Immediately after
their marriage, the parents of the subject of
this sketch, removed with the rest of the
family to Texas, settling on land near Fiskville,
in Travis county. Here the father of
Mr. Holman of this notice, died March 21,
1861, leaving his family and many friends to
mourn his loss. He was a man of good English
education, and in early life was a successful
teacher; his later days, however, were
devoted to farming, in which he was also
prosperous. He was a Democrat in his political
views, and a man of the strictest integrity
and highest moral character. He was
the father of three sons: James S., a merchant
and ginger of Hutto, Williamson
county, Texas; Willis D., a stockman of that
county; and Owen Higgins, whose name
heads this sketch. After his father's death,
Mr. Holman's mother married J. A. Cato, a
native of Alabama, and they resided several
years in Travis county, but later removed to
HuItto, where the mother still lives, J. A.
Cato having died March 10, 1893. By this
union there were three children, who also reside
in Hutto: Fannie C., wife of C. R.
Stephens, in the lumber business; George H.,
a dealer in wood and coal; and Virgie C..
wife of W. A. May, a merchant.
The life of Owen Higgins Holman, although
that of a young man, affords a strik

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Lewis Publishing Company, publisher. History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families. Chicago. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29785/. Accessed August 30, 2014.