History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families

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HISTORY OF TEXAS 785

he went to Indiana, was there married to the
mother of our subject, then the widow
Early, and lived there twenty-six years. On
moving too that State the Indians were
numerous and hostile, and he assisted in
building the first house on the present site
of Terre Haute. In 1838 the family came
to Texas, although the father had come to
this State the year previous on a prospecting
tour, and purchased land in Cherokee county.
He afterward located on the place where our
subject resides, and the old log cabin, which
he built in an early day, still stands in the
field. The mother departed this life in 1859,
and the father in 1868. The latter was a
Democrat in political matters, and a member
of the Methodist Church. He left a
large property at his death. Mr. and Mrs.
Puckett were the parents of eight children,
viz: Irena, deceased; Hannah, deceased; L.
D., of Tom Green county, Texas; C. R., deceased;
the subject of this sketch; Miranda
C. and Useba, twins, the former the widow of
Alexander McRae, of Austin; and the latter
wife of Nathaniel Moore, of Lincoln county,
New Mexico; and Elijah, deceased.
C. Puckett was reared to manhood in
Texas, and early in life engaged in the stock
business. He went with cattle to Coryell
county, and was there during the late war,
in which he served in the western part of
the State. In 1867 he located on his present
farm of 700 acres in Travis county, 300
acres of which is under a fine state of cultivation.

Mr. Puckett was married in this county,
March 26, 1867, to Miranda C. Moore, who
was born in Clark county, Arkansas,
January 2, 1840, a daughter of Thomas W.
and Mathilress (Yates) Moore. The father
came to Texas at the age of sixteen years,
with Austin's first colony. After the battle

of San Jacinto he received word that his
first wife was dying, and he immediately
went to headquarters to ask for a leave of
absence, stating the reason. He was refused
by Houston, who said if he attempted to go
he would be shot. However, Mr. Moore
went to his tent and prepared to leave, but
Mr. Houston ordered a detail to surround
him, and to shoot if he moved. Mr. Moore
pointed his gun at Houston and told him to
give the word if he dared, but he would be
the first to drop, and he returned home in
safety. Mr. and Mrs. Puckett have four
children,-Thomas, of Runnels county,
Texas; Elihu, a resident of Travis county,
Leon, also of Runnels county; and Cyrus,
at home. Mr. Puckett affiliates with the
Democratic party.
J E. COOPER, editor of the Williamson
County Sun, and an attorney of Georgetown,
the subject of this sketch, is a
man of whom Judge Chessher says: "He is a
straightforward, reliable and successful business
man, true as steel and honorable in every
way. His success in business has been attained
in a quiet manner and he has never
bored anyone with his paper." Mr. Cooper
was born in Maury county, Tennessee, February
5, 1855, and came of the noted Cooper
family of that State. His parents, Robert
T. and Louise Clementine Cooper, were
both natives of Tennessee, where they were
reared and married. The former, a farmer
of Tennessee, served as Sheriff of Lewis coTinty
for one term, and enjoyed an extensive acquaintance.
During the late war he enlisted
in 1861, was made Captain of Company H,
Third Tennessee Infantry, and was taken
prisoner at Fort Donelson, being retained

HISTOR Y OF TEXA

785

Lewis Publishing Company, publisher. History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families. Chicago. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29785/. Accessed July 22, 2014.