History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families

HISTORY OF TEXAS.

forgotten. He attended to the errand and
was back in due time. While he was gone
the party had been visited by a lot of bloodthirsty
Indians, who had killed the entire
party, and this alone was perhaps all that
saved him from a like fate. He found their
bodies scattered here and there, and all were
sleeping that sleep that knows no waking. Our
subject served on this side of the Mississippi
river, in Missouri, Arkansas and Louisiana,
was in no great battles, but saw much hard
service. He was with General Marinaduke,
of Missouri, for the most part. Mr. Brittain
returned home in May, 1865, resumed farming,
but soon afterward took a drove of horses
to Arkansas, which proved a successful trip.
B e was next engaged in merchandising about
twelve years, and then, in 1875, returned to
his farm, where he followed that occupation
and trading in live stock. He still owns a
ranch near town, and also a drove of horses
in the West. In 1891 Mr. Brittain embarked
in the marble business in Georgetown, with
0. L. Spencer, in which they are doing well.
Our subject was married in 1869 to Miss
Julia Posey, a daughter of James C. Posey,
of thiq county. They have five children,
viz.: Maud, wife of Jack Duke, of Round
Rock, this county; Pat C., attending the
Southwestern University; Posey; Frank L.
and Jessie May. The wife and mother died
in 1879, aged thirty-three years. Mr. Brittain
is a member of blue lodge and chapter,
and religiously is a member of the Methodist
Episcopal Church. In early days our
subject was well acquainted with such men as
Pinkney Anderson, Sam Houston, Philip
Clayburn, Bert Simons, Bob Taylor and
others whose names figure in Texas pioneer
history. These gentlemen were not afraid to
do and dare, and to them the civilization of
the present day is greatly due. Captain

Brittaln, like many others, has done his part
in opening up the frontier and preparing the
way for the pace of civilization and progress,
which the present generation now enjoys.
He has ever been in thorough sympathy with
the progress and growth of the community
on every line of advancement.
O HN FAUBION, of Williamson county,
is a son of William ani Rosanna (Ayers).
Faubion. This is one of the oldeet
families in the State, and of German descent.
Grandfather Jacob Faubion emigrated to
America about the middle of the eighteenth.
century, married an English lady, and lived
for a time in Pennsylvania. In 1760 they
moved to the eastern part of what is now
Tennessee, settling in what afterward became
Cocke county, where he raised a large family.
Several of his sons participated in the war of
1812. William Faubion, father of our subject,
passed his entire lifetime in that county.
He was married at the age of eigteen years,
and they had eight children, four now living:
John, our subject; Frethias, of Cocke county,
Tennessee; William, of Milam county, Texas;
and Tillman A., of Burnet, this State. The
Faubion family have been farmers and blacksmiths
by occupation, and are Baptists in
their religious views. The mother of our bubject
came from South Carolina to Tennessee.
While making the journey the wagon needed
repairing, and they camped at the blacksmith
shop of Mr. Faubion, where they became acquainted,
and were married the following
morning. Her parents continued the journey
to middle Tennessee. Mrs. Faubion died a
few years after marriage, and her husband
departed this life in 1839.
John Faubion, the subject of this sketch,
was born in Cocke county, Tennessee, Febru

488

Lewis Publishing Company, publisher. History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families. Chicago. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29785/. Accessed December 22, 2014.