History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families

HY--- OFTX

the universal esteem of his fellowmen. The
mother of the subject of this sketch bore the
Maiden name of Lizzie Williamson, and was
a daughter of James Williamson, a Georgia
planter, in which State she was born. The.
children of James M. and Lizzie Bates were:
Amanda, who married J. F. McIntyre; Josie
M., who first married William M. Mahaffey
and after his death, a Mr. Blagg; William
Benson, of this article; Alexander H.; and
Sarah Ann, who died at the age of thirty.
On the death of his wife in 1852, James M.
Bates married Rebecca McIntyre, and they
had three children: James Washington, Benjamin
Franklin and John Rice.
William Benson Bates, whose name heads
this sketch, was reared on his father's farm
near Atlanta, Georgia, where he remained
until he became of age. His father moved
to northern Alabama some time during the
war, and it was from that State that Mr.
Bates came to Texas a few years later. On
coming to this State, he settled in Burleson
county and secured his first employment as a
clerk for T. J. Pampell, at Lyons. He was
engaged in the mercantile business, first, as
a clerk and, later, as a partner, at Lyons, for
about two years, at the end of which time he
began handling cattle and followed this pursuit
actively and exclusively up to 1882. At
that date, he settled on a farm near Lyons, in
Burleson county, where he engaged in agricultural
pursuits, and his interests have since
been farming and stock growing. He owns
a ranch in Fort Bend county, which represents
a considerable in-vestment, and to which
he gives a good portion of his time and attention.

On December 21, 1881, Mr. Bates married
Miss Z. S. Fulford, who moved from
Montgomery, Alabama, to Texas some time
in the '50s. They have four children: John

Sly, James C., Charles T. and George F.
This prosperity represents the outlay of a
commensurate amount of energy and attention,
and Mr. Bates is justly deserving of all
the good fortune which the future may have
in store for him.
R. JOHN E. WALKER, physician
and surgeon of Georgetown, Texas,
was born in Rockbridge county, Varginia,
December 4, 1831, a son of John C.
and Margaret (Coulton) Walker, who were
born, reared and married in that State. The
grandfather of our subject was a soldier in
the Revolutionary war. John C. Walker,
took part in the war of 1812. In 1836 he
moved his family from Virginia to Montgomery
county, Indiana, where he followed agricultural
pursuits. He was a cousin of Alexander
H. Stewart, who served as Secretary of
the Interior under the administration of
President Fillmore. Mr. Walker died in
Montgomery county, soon after the late war,
at the age of seventy years. He was an attendant,
although not a member, of the Presbyterian
Church, of which the family were
members. He was the embodiment of those
qualities which go to make up honorable
manhood, was a man of high honor, strict integrity,
and splendidly equipped for intelligent
citizenship. The mother of our subject
died soon after they came to Indiana. Mr.
and Mrs. Walker were the parents of four
children: Archibald, a farmer by occupation,
died in Montgomery county, Indiana; Judge
A. S., Reporter of the Supreme Court, in
Austin; Robert C., a resident of Iowa; and
John E., our subject.
The latter attended the Waveland Academy,
of Indiana, and later the Wabash Col

796

HIrSTORYOPTEAS

Lewis Publishing Company, publisher. History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families. Chicago. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29785/. Accessed December 18, 2014.