History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families

HISTORY OP TEXAS.

Commissioner from 1891 to 1892, and in the
latter year was elected Sheriff of his county.
He also served out the unexpired term of his
predecessor, J. T. Olive, who was waylaid
and killed in September, 1892.
Our subject was married in 1877, to Miss
Hattie Hurt. a daughter of James H. Hurt,
of Brenham, Texas. They have five children:
Leora, Lola, William, Ralph and one unnamed.
Mrs. Brookshire is a member of the
Baptist Church. Socially, our subject affiliates
with the Masonic order, blue lodge,
chapter and commandry. He is a man of
decided character, strong in his attachments,
and devoted to his many friends. He is
noted for his benevolence and kindness of
heart, is gentle and sympathetic in his nature,
never deaf to the cry of distress, or blind to
the merits of the deserving, who stand in
need of a friend. His selection for the important
office he holds, and the unanimity of
desire for his continuance in the same, are
ample proof of his qualification. He places
a high estimate on the personal character and
the good name of those to whom are confided
public trusts. Mr. Brookshire takes rank
among the responsible, worthy and most
highly esteemed citizens of the county.
'OHN R. SIMS, M. D., who has been
prominently identified with the interests
of Burleson county, Texas, since
1868, and who has resided at Tunis since
1872, is one of the representative men of his
county.
Dr. Sims was born in west Tennessee,
December 13, 1828, and when quite young
removed to Columbus, Mississippi, where he
was reared. He received his education in

the common schools and the Franklin Academy.
At the age of twenty he began the
study of medicine under the instructions of
Dr. Richard Harrison, with whom he remained
a year and a half. Then he took a
medical course in a college at New Orleans,
after which he entered a medical college in
Philadelphia, graduating in the latter instit ution
in the winter of 1850-'l. Returning to
Mississippi, he began the practice of his profession
in that State and continued there until
his coming to Texas, as above stated.
During the war he served as Assistant Surgeon
in the Forty-third Mississippi Regiment
for some time; later, on account of ill health,
was placed on the Board of Medical Examiners.
After coming to Texas he continued
the practice of his profession until about
1885, when he practically retired. He still,
however, does some office practice. From
time to time since coming to this State he
has made investments in land until he is now
the owner of about 640 acres in three farms,
two being located on the Brazos bottoms and
one near the village of Tunis. This land lie
has under cultivation and rented to tenants.
Dr. Sims is a son of William and Rachel
(Walker) Sims, of Culpeper county, Virginia.
His father was a soldier in the war of 1812;
was by trade a carpenter and gin-wright and
died in Columbus, Mississippi, in 1847. The
Doctor's mother was a daughter of Honorable
Samuel Walker, who was a native of South
Carolina and who served as Speaker of the
House of the Alabama Legislature. He was
a leader in politics and in religion was a
Primitive Baptist. He died in 1841. William
and Rachel Sims had four children, the
Doctor being the second born. Colonel M.
W. Sims, the Doctor's brother, is a farmer
at Bryan, Brazos county, these two being the
only ones of the family in Texas.

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Lewis Publishing Company, publisher. History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families. Chicago. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29785/. Accessed August 28, 2014.