History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families

HISI'ORY OF TEXAS. 799~~~~

The subject of our sketch now has his
second wife. His first wife's maiden name
was Miss Virginia S. Holiway. She was born
in Mississippi in 1843, daughter of Samuel
Holiway who went from Alabama to that
State, and there passed the rest of his life on
*a farm. Mrs. Sims died in July, 1872. She
had three children, two of whom died in infancy.
The other, Samuel H., is married and
has a family and resides in Oklahoma. In
1880 Dr. Sims married Miss Mary McMorries,
who was born in Mississippi, July
24, 1844, daughter of Baxter and Martha
(Herrington) McMorries, of South Carolina.
Her father went to Mississippi in 1811 and
died there in 1857. His wife with her second
husband (Mr. Eubank) moved to Texas in
1865, and died in BryaD, Brazos county, in
1876. Mrs. Sims is the oldest of their children,
and one of the four who are still living.
By his second wife the Doctor has two children;
Mamie, born October 15, 1881, and
John R,, February 5, 1886.
Dr. Sims is a Democrat, a Royal Arch
Mason, and a member of the Methodist
Episcopal Church. His wife is a Presbyterian.

J OHN T. BRYSON, Cotton Weigher of
Georgetown, Texas, and one of the
most prominent citizens of Williamson
county, was born in Henderson county,
North Carolina, September 28, 1857, a son
of Martha and R. B. Bryson, natives also of
North Carolina. The parents were married
in their native State, and came to Williamson
county, Texas, in 1865. The father was
born in 1819, and died in this county
November 24, 1872, having been a member
of the Methodist Episcopal Church for about

twenty-five years. He was a quiet, unassuming
farmer, extensively known, and highly respected.
Mr. Bryson was also an old Confederate
soldier, having enlisted in April,
1861, and served until the close of the struggle.
He was appointed Inspector of horses,
which was a public trust of great responsibility,
but his services was rendered -in an
efficient manner. He was in Ransom's
Division, but sent back with Captain Lane
to look after home matters. His farm of
900 acres is still in the possession of the
family. Mrs. Bryson, born in 1818, died
October 2, 1892, having also been a nime, ber
of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Mr. aid
Mrs. Bryson were good old people, substantial
citizens, devout Christians, and of signal usefulness.
They traveled life's pathway together
for many years, and were not long
separated. Having passed from earth's activities,
their memory is a precious inheritance.
They were the parents of four
children, as follows: J. C., who resides on a
farm near Leander, this county, married Miss
Nancy Wells, and they have five children,Emma,
Robert, Ella, Henry, Myrtle. Mary,
tihe second child is the wife of Edd Girvin,
and they reside on the old home farm. They
have five children,-Julia, Walter, Fitzhugh,
May and Guy. Rachel, wife of T. W.
McGill, resides in Georgetown, and has three
children,-Wayne, Ollie and one unnamed.
John T. Bryson, the youngest child, and
the subject of this sketch, was educated in
the county schools, and reared to farm life.
He was successfully engaged in farming
until 1892, when he was elected County
Weigher. He was married in 1878, to Miss
Ella Magill, a daughter of Captain J. P.
Magill, of Leander. To this union have been
born three children,-Grace, Jeff and Gertrude.
Mrs. Bryson is a member of the

HISTS2OR YOFTXS

799

Lewis Publishing Company, publisher. History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families. Chicago. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29785/. Accessed July 23, 2014.