History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families

8O

Methodist Church. Politically, our subject
affiliates with the Democratic party, and
socially, is a member of the I. 0. 0. F. Mr.
Bryson's success in life is due to his fine
business ability and unflagging industry. He
is honored by his fellow citizens for his high
character, and his pleasing, social qualities
have won for him a coterie of friends almost
as numerous as his acquaintances.
S TEPHEN BOZARTH, a Justice of the
Peace in Giddings, Texas, was born in
Pope county, Illinois, February 27,
1826. His parents were Grarl and Mary
(Wilson) Bozarth, both of whom were natives
of Kentucky. The former followed farming
in that State until he was thirty years of age,
when he removed to Illinois, of which State
hle was a pioneer. He ran the Kanawha salt
works for many years until salt began to be
shipped from the East, when the works ceased
to jay. Then he went back to his old farm,
but in 1838 he moved to New Madrid county,
Missouri, and before death became one of the
well known men of the locality.
The grandfather of our subject came to
America with General Lafayette and later
became a member of the staff of that distinguished
General. He died many years
since, in Kentucky, when our subject's father
was a small boy. After the close of the war
the old gentleman returned to France, but the
United States Government gave him large
grants of land in Kentucky for his services
during the Revolution, and he came back and
settled in the then wild State with Souverns,
Vometer and Linn, these being the first white
families, who located there. Linn was presumed
to have been killed by the Indians.

In some of the histories of the State an
instance is given of a case, where a Mrs.
Guthrie killed six Indians with a broad ax,
and this heroic woman was the sister of our
subject's father. The latter, Israel Bozarth,
died in 1859, having been born in 1784.
His wife was born in 1796, and died in 1880,
both of them having been members of the
Cumberland Presbyterian Church, but later,
in Missouri, they joined with the Methodist
Episcopal Church. They reared nine children,
one other having died at the age of ten
years. Our subject is the seventh child, and
three of the family are still living: W. B., in
San Jacinto county, Texas, and a sister,
Mary Thornbury, who lives in Miller county,
Missouri.
The first business in which our subject engaged
was that of farming, and he has followed
it in connection with trading in stock.
He was elected Justice of the Peace and
County Commissioner soon after the war
opened, and these offices exempted him for a
time from service, but later he enlisted in the
State troops and was in Camp Cooks, where
he was discharged after a hemorrhage of the
lungs. He came to Texas in 1859, settling
in Bosque county, and began farming and
dealing in stock. He bought a fine lot of
horses in Missouri and remained in that same
county until 1869, when he came to Washington,
now Lee county, to engage in
farming.
After coming to this county our subject
settled four miles north of Giddings, where
he remained until be sold his farm in 1884.
He then bought another on Yegua creek, in
the same county, which he still owns. He
removed-to the town of Giddings in the fall
of 1888, remaining there four years, and then
removed to the farm until 1892, when he
returned to town. He filled the office of .Js

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Lewis Publishing Company, publisher. History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families. Chicago. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29785/. Accessed April 21, 2014.