History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families

802 HISTORY OF TEXAS.

house for her father, until he, too, passed
away, when she went to live with her brother
Chauncqy, with whom she remained until
her marriage.
She was married April 17, 1873, to Dr.
Alexander McRae, a native of Mississippi.
Dr. McRae was educated in one of the eastern
colleges, and after his graduation settled
for the practice of his profession, about 1870,
in Hornsby Bend. They had two children,
Chester, who died at the age of six months,
and E. T., now seventeen years of age, and the
pride of his fond mother. Some years passed,
when husband and wife concluded it would
conduce to the happiness of each to live
apart.
Ini 1882 Mrs. McRae went to Tuscola, Illinois,
to care for her invalid sister, [rena.
This sister had married Caleb Garrett, a
wealthy and influential gentleman, and was
living in Tuscola, when, in 1880 she received
a stroke of paralysis. Mr. Garrett died in
1887, and .his wife followed him in 1890.
Mrs. McRae returned to Texas in 1892, since
which time she has been living in her new
home within the charming resort in the suburbs
of Austin, known as Hyde Park.
J ,ON. W. K. MAKEMSON, an attorney,
and senior member of the law firm
of Makemson & Roberts, of Georgetown,
Texas, was born at Danville,
Vermilion county, Illinois, February 26,
1836. His parents were Samuel L., and
Martha (Knight) Makemson, the former a
native of Kentucky, and the latter of Ohio.
The parents were married in 1834. In 1828
the father moved from near Cynthiana, Harrison
county, Kentucky, to Vermilion county,
Illinois, locating seven miles west of Dan ville,

on the middle fork of the Vermilion river,
near .the town now called Oakwood. November
25, 1847, in company with his family,
and John and Doctor William Knight, and
their families, he located on Brushy creek,
Williamson county, Texas. While in Illinois,
Mr. Makemson took part in the Sac war,
during part of which time he was stationed
at fort Dearborn, Chicago, assisting to rebuild
that fort. Later, be was engaged in
removing the Indians from Illinois to their
reservation. He was a farmer by occupation,
and a pioneer who carried the respect of all
who knew him. He was an earnest and devout
member of the Methodist Episcopal
Church from his boyhood days. As a Christian
he was earnest, self sacrificing, and took
a broad view of his personal responsibility.
He died in Brushy Creek, in June, 1850.
Thomas Makemnson, the father of Samuel L.,
with six brothers, took part in the Revolutionary
war. ltwo of the Malkemsons (as the
name was spelled in the early days of the
Republic) were killed in battle, and the remaining
five returned. Later, one of these,
a captain of a vessel, was killed in sight of
fort Henry. Thomas Makeinson, the grandfather
of our subject, was the youngest of
seven brothers. He was two years of age
when they came from Ireland, settling in
Maryland, but after the Revolutionary war
Thomas emigrated to Kentucky. He was
there married to Jane Lindsey, and they had
the following children: Rebecca, Andrew,
James, Samuel L., David, Eliza, Nancy and
Polly Ann.
Hon. W. K. Makemson, the subject of this
sketch, is among the early pioneers of this
locality. lie heard the first sermon ever
preached in Williamson county, which was
on Bushy creek, at Freeman Smalley's house,
by Rev. Talifaro. Dr. Dane Knight, brother

803

HISBTORY F EX

Lewis Publishing Company, publisher. History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families. Chicago. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29785/. Accessed January 30, 2015.