History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families

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EVENTS AFTER THE WAR.
While Governor Henderson was absent in
commatid of the Texan volunteers, his place
was filled by Lieutenant-Governor Horton.
December 21, 1847, George T. Wood was
inaugurated as. the second governor of the
State, and John A. Greer as lieutenantgovernor.

During Wood's administration a dispute
arose which made many a Texan sorry lie
voted for annexation. When war was declared
between the United States and Mexico,
General S. W. Kearny took possession of
Santa F4 in the name of the latter government;
and when, by the treaty of Guadalupe
Hidalgo, N ew Mexico was ceded to the
United States, Colonel Munroe was placed in
command there. In 1848 the Texan legislature
sent a judge (Beard) to hold court there,
still maintaining that that part of the country
was a portion of Texas, as at first decided
by them. Colonel Munroe, however,
ignored the Texan judge, and ordered the
election of a Territorial delegate to the government
at Washington. The controversy
grew violent, and Governor Wood threatened
force. The Washington government announced
that it would resist it. The matter
entered into national politics as a new side
issue between the North and the South, the
latter sympathizing with the claims of Texas.
This matter was at length "settled" by absorption
into another question, namely, that
of the public debt of Texas, soon to be mentioned.

The election of 1849 resulted in the choice
of P. Hansborough Bell for governor, while
John A. Greer was re-elected lieutenantgovernor.
For the next presidential term
Governor Bell was re-elected. During his
administration two absorbing questions were

settled,-the boundary line and the public
debt. The particulars in regard to these
delicate and complicated matters are thus
carefully worded in If. II. Bancroft's His
tory:
"On the incorporation of Texas into the
Union, the United States Government, of
course, acquired the revenue derived from
the customs. These receipts, however, had
been pledged by the late Republic as security
for the payment of a certain portion of her
debt; and when they were passed over to the
Federal Government the bondholders clamorously
maintained that the United States had
become responsible for the liabilities of Texas,
and pressed for a speedy settlement. That
portion of the debt, however, for which the
revenue from customs was specially pledged,
amounted to only $868,000 ostensible value,
or $611,784.50 par value. This matter, as
well as the boundary question, was discussed
at great length in both houses, and January
29, 1850, Henry Clay introduced, among
other 'compromise resolutions,' one designed
to solve the perplexing questions of dispute
with Texas.
"Me.intime the excitement with regard to
the question of ownership of that part of
New Mexico lying east of the Rio Grande,
increased both in Texas and the United
States. To show her serious determination
not to yield her claim, a joint resolution was
passed, February 11, 1850, by the legislature
of the new State, asserting not only her right
to the disputed ground, but declaring her intention
to maintain the integrity of her territory.
The several resolutions of Clay's bill
were slowly discussed, and August 5, 1850,
James A. Pearce, senator from Maryland, introduced
a bill making definite propositions
to the State of Texas relative to her boundary
and the payment of her public debt.

8i

JUSTOR, Y OP TEXA8.

Lewis Publishing Company, publisher. History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families. Chicago. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29785/. Accessed July 13, 2014.