History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families

82X tlSTORt OF TEXAs.

they were to this effect: Texas was to agree
that her boundary on the north should commence
at the point at which the meridian of
100 west from Greenwich is intersected by
the parallel of 36 30' north latitude, and
should run from that point due west to the
meridian of 103 west from Greenwich;
thence the boundary line should run due
south to the 32 of north latitude, thence on
said parallel to the Rio Grande, and thence
with the channel of that river to the gulf of
Mexico. Texas was to cede to the United
States all her claim to territory outside of
these limits, and to relinquish all claim on
the United States for liability for her debts,
or compensation for the surrender of her
ships, forts, customhouses, customhouse revenue.
public buildings, etc. The United States,
in consideration of the establishment of said
boundary and relinquishment of claims, would
pay to Texas $10,000,000, in stock bearing
five per cent. and redeemable at the end of
fourteen years. No more than $5,000,000 of
said stock was to be issued until the creditors
of the State of Texas had filed at the treasury
of the United States releases of all claims
against the United States on account of Texan
bonds.
"This bill passed the senate August 7, by
a vote of 30 yeas and 20 nays, and on September
4 following passed the house by a
vote of 108 against 97. A copy of the bill,
called the Boundary Act, was forwarded to
Governor Bell, who forthwith called an extra
session of the legislature. In his message
Bell advised the occupancy of Santa Fe with
a military force, suggesting, however, that the
vacant lands of that district might be sold to
the United States provided that Texas re,tained
-jurisdiction over it. Apart from the
unwillingness to yield territory on a general
principle, there was one feature in the bill

especially repulsive to the Texans, and that
was the retaining of half of the $10,000,000
in the United States treasury until the creditors
of Texas were paid. This self-protective
condition imposed by the United States was
regarded as a reflection on Texas, since it
seemed to insinuate that she would not be
disposed to meet her liabilities promptly if
she obtained possession of the whole amount.
Then again. agreement to the propositions
was required to be given on or before December
1, 1850,-a proviso which, taken
with the general tone of the document and
the unconditional assent expected, was regarded
as a symptom of domination to which
a sovereign ought not to be subject. The
question having been discussed with much
warmth and at great length, the propositions
of the United States were finally accepted,
November 25, 1850, and a law passed to that
effect. By this act Texas waived her fictitious
claim to about 98,380 square miles of the
territory of New Xexico;" and thus it seems
that all the important questions were settled
regarding the evolution of Texas from an
unprogressive province of Mexico to a complete
membership in the American Union,
with every prospect of prosperity and peace.
" This matter having been settled," continues
Bancroft, "the $5,000,000 was paid
into the State treasury in February, 1852.
The amount of the indebtedness of the late
republic had been determined previously by
the State. According to the report of the
auditor and comptroller, dated November 12,
1851, the ostensible indebtedness of Texas
was $12,436,991, including interest; but the
State, in view of the low price at which a
large portion of the bonds issued by the republican
government had been bold, did not
consider itself bound to pay their fall fae
value, and in January, 1852, the legislature

Lewis Publishing Company, publisher. History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families. Chicago. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29785/. Accessed July 13, 2014.