History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families

HISTORY OF TEXAS. 813

Reed, and they had fourteen children, all of
whom were married and raised families. He
died in 1833, the same year as his son John,
the father of our subject, both dying near
Springfield of the cholera. The disease was
so terrible at that time that the merchants of
Springfield closed their stores, and many
moved to other places. Mrs. Hughes died
about 1858, at the age of seventy-seven years.
Both she and her husband were members of
the Presbyterian Church. Barnabas Hughes
was a farmer near Danville, Kentucky, and
John made a fortune in the mercantile business
in that city. The children of Mr. and
Mrs. Edward Hughes were: James R., who
served as county and circuit clerk of Union
county, Kentucky, many years, married Rachel
Givens; John, the father of our subject;
Elizabeth, who married William Muldrow,
and they moved to Missouri; Letitia and
Maria, twins; Margaret married Isaac Covington,
lived near Bowling Green, Kentucky,
and had four children; Edward married Mary
Donahue, and had three daughters; Jonathan
married Minerva Givens, Sheriff of Union
county, Kentucky, and they had two sons and
four daughters; Daniel B., still living, married
Susan Crosby, and has two sons and four
daughters; Willis G., formerly an attorney
of Morgansfield, Kentucky, had four sons and
two daughters by his first marriage, and by
his second marriage, to Bettie Barber, had
two sons and two daughters; Sarah, married
Lile Irvine, and had one daughter, Reed;
Rev. Samuel K., a minister of the Presbyterian
Church, who moved to Ohio; and
Thomas B. married Hattie Calhoun. They
had five children, two sons and three daughters.
The eldest son, John C., resides in
Missouri, and Edward died unmarried.
Letitia, the fourth child of Mr. and Mrs.
Hughes, married Hugh Waldron and moved

to Missouri: they had two children. Her
husband died, and she afterward came to
Texas and married John Smock. Maria, her
twin sister, married Samuel Vantrees, and
after his death she became the wife of' a Mr.
Payton. They now reside in Bowling Green,
Kentucky. The maternal grandfather of our
subject, Fred Nantz, was a soldier in the
Revolutionary war, and assisted in the overthrow
of tea in the Boston harbor. IHe also
procured some coffee from the same vessel,
which is still in the possession of the family.
Judge Hughes, the subject of this sketch,
was educated in Kentucky, and is a graduate
of Center College, in the class of 1848, which
comprised thirty-five pupils. After gradlLating
he read law under Judge Booker, of
Springfield, Kentucky, and also under his
uncle, Willis G. Hughes. He obtained
license under the Appellate Court of Kentucky,
in 1850, and left that State the same
year, arriving in Georgetown, Texas, in
February, 1851. He is now the third oldest
male inhabitant of this city, the others being
W. C. Dalrymtple and John Shell. Mr.
Hughes began practice with his cousin, Edd
II. Vantrees, they having also attended the
same college. The latter, who held the rank
of Captain, was killed by lightning in Louisiana,
while on an errand to see General Taylor
to change the camping ground. He and
his horse were instantly killed. Our subject
then continued practice alone until 1860,
when he formed a partnership with J. J.
Dimmitt, under the firm name of Hughes &
Dimmitt, and this continued until the latter
moved to Missouri, in 1862. In 1861 the
Judge canvassed Williamson county as an
anti-secessionist, and at the following election
was elected by a large majority a delegate
to the secession convention, to meet
at Austin. He was one of thirteen to vote

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HISTOR Y PTXS

Lewis Publishing Company, publisher. History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families. Chicago. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29785/. Accessed December 20, 2014.