History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families

lISTORY OF TEXAS.

she met and married David Duncan, a son
of Gardner Duncan, a native of Glasgow,
Scotland. Mr. Gardner Duncan had the following
children: James, David, John, Lowrie,
Mrs. Jane Rickards, Mrs. Marion Stevens,
Grace and Mrs. Cecilian B. Francis.
Mr. Francis was United States Consul to
Victoria, under Lincoln, of whom he was a
great friend. Mr. David Duncan was
drowned while crossing the Sangamon river,
in Illinois, in an early day. His wife died
of cholera in Louisville, Kentucky. Their
daughter, Henrietta Spence, resides with her
sister, Mrs. Hughes, in Georgetown. Mr.
and Mrs. Hughes have one child, Thomas P.,
a pupil of the Southwestern University. Mrs.
Hughes is a lady of culture and refinement,
and is a leader of the social circles of the
city. While in the practice of law, Judge
Hughes ranked as one of the first jurists of
the State, and is distinguished as a man of
integrity and public spirit. Both he and his
wife are members of the Presbyterian Church,
and the former also affiliates with the Masonic
order, Blue Lodge and Chapter.
i OU G H BARTON, a prominent and
highly respectable citizen of Bastrop
county, Texas, has been identified with
the best interests of this place since
1854. He was born in Tennessee, January 3,
1817, and at the age of twelve years moved
with his parents to Alabama, where he was
reared on a farm and received a commonschool
education. At the age of twenty-two
he engaged in the mercantile business in that
State, where he continued until 1854. That
year he sold out and came to Texas. Upon
his arrival here he located near where he
now lives. He bought a tract of land, 1,000

acres, 100 acres of which were under cultivation.
No buildings, however, had been
erected on it, and he at once began the
work of improvement. His present commodious
residence he built in 1870, and he now
has 400 acres under cultivation, his principal
crop being corn and cotton. In 1878 he
erected a store building and opened out a
stock of general merchandise. For ten years
he conducted a successful business, at the end
of which time he sold out to other parties.
He has also been connected with various
other enterprises. For many years he ran a
cotton gin. During the Civil war he was
detailed by the Government to run the potash
works near his place, and was thus engaged
all through the war. Before the war
he owned a large number of slaves.
Mr. Barton is a son of Dr. Hugh and
Mary (Shirley) Barton, both natives of Virginia,
his grandfather, Roger Barton, having
come from England to this country and settled
in the Old Dominion. In connection
with his professional duties Dr. Barton also
carried on farming occupations. He died in
Alabama about 1848, and his wife passed
away the same year. Following are the
names of their children, only three of whom
are now living, viz.: Armstead; Roger;
Elizabeth, wife of William Dixon; Arthur;
Margarette, wife of John W. Rutland;
Mariah, wife of E. Carloss; Hugh, the subject
of this sketch; John; Clark, who died
at the age of sixteen years; Louisa V., wife
of L. V. Warren, a resident of Austin, Texas;
and James L., who died in Alabama.
The subject of our sketch was married i-n
Alabama, in 1871, to Miss Jennie Harris,
who was born in that State, May 19, 1841;
and soon after his marriage came with his
bride to Texas. Of her parents, James and
Martha (Mathews) Harris, we record that her

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Lewis Publishing Company, publisher. History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families. Chicago. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29785/. Accessed July 30, 2014.