History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families

8 1H I TOR OFTX

Ipswich, Massachusetts, in 1622, and lived
for generations near Newbury, that State.
The grandparents of Mrs.Wales finally located
in Shelby county, Kentucky. Dr. Philip
Adams was born in Newbury, Massachusetts,
in 1829, is a graduate of the Lexington
(Kentucky) Medical College, and has practiced
his profession many years in. Florence,
Texas. He was married in this city, May 6,
1856, to Nancy A. Caskey, and they have
had eight children, namely: Sallie V., wife
of our subject; Mary A., now Mrs. W. L.
Swinney, of Florence; Lura M., wife of J.
L. Paden, of Farmnersville, Texas; Mattie R.,
wife of William Miller, of Florence; John
L., also a resident of this city; and George
E., Susie G. and Eleanor, at home. Mr. and
Mrs. Wales have had five children: Robert,
Ella Aurelia, Winia, Prosper and Herrmer.
Mr. Wales affiliates with the Democratic
party, and his wife is a member of the Christian
Church.
J AMES KNIGHT, Postmaster of Georgetown,
was born in Danville, Vermilion
county, Illinois, February 4, 1839, a son
of Dr. William and Mary A. (Baugh) Knight,
the former a native of Montgomery county,
Ohio, and the latter of Kentucky. The father
studied medicine three years with Dr. Coleman,
an old physician of Dayton, Ohio,
practiced medicine at Danville, Illinois, and
in the fall of 1847 removed from that city to
Texas, settling the first year at Brushy, Williamnson
county. In 1848 he came to Georgetown,
where he followed his profession until
death, in 1850, at the age of fifty-four years.
His death was caused from exposure while
practicing in Illinois, and for the benefit of
health he came to Texas. He was the third

practicing physician to locate in this State.
Mrs. Knight died in the fall of 1880, aged
sixty-six years. She was a member of the
Presbyterian Church.
James Knight, the eldest of six children,
all living in Texas, was educated in this State.
At the breaking out of the late war he was
serving as District Clerk, but was then
warned he could hold the office no longer.
He accordingly crossed the Rio Grande river,
and became one of General A. J. Hamilton's
body guards. General Hamilton was made
Provisional Governor by President Lincoln,
and was coming to Texas to take charge of
the State. The intention was to march on
and take the Capitol, expecting to return
home six weeks after starting, but General
Banks was defeated on Red river, which
necessitated a retreat. There were about 5,000
Federal troops stationed at Brownsville,
Texas, ut ho expected to take part as regulars.
They retreated to New Orleans, and served
out their time of one year in that State. Mr.
Knight was examined with others, having had
a knowledge of medicine, and passed an examination
before the Medical Board of Examiners,
was appointed Hospital Steward, in
which capacity he served until the close of
the struggle. He tried to take part in the
battle of Mobile, but a New Orleans Commanding
General, who was appointed after
General Butler, forbade their going, telling
them if captured they would be shot as
spies.
In August, 1865, Mr. Knight engaged in
merchandising in Georgetown, which he continued
twelve years. When he first came to
Williamson county it contained only a few
families. At one time they were holding
court in the log court house when several
buffaloes, which were being chased by dogs
and horsemen, ran through the town, and

818

HIS~TOR Y PTXS

Lewis Publishing Company, publisher. History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families. Chicago. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29785/. Accessed December 28, 2014.