History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families

HIOYO TX A8 1

they were killed about a quarter of a mile
below Georgetown. Mr. Knight in those
early days saved the life of his cousin twice
in one day, first by killing a large American
lion, and next a large wild male bog. After
closing his mercantile business our subject
began driving cattle to Kansas, continuing
that occupation three years, and was the
second man to drive cattle from Williamson
county to that State. He then farmed for a
time, and next began gardening, having also
raised the first strawberries in this county,
six miles west of Georgetown, at North Gabriel.
May 14, 1890 he was appointed Postmaster
of Georgetown, and his official work
has given the highest degree of satisfaction.
As a citizen Mr. Knight has always interested
himself in all movements that tend to improve
the conditions of life, and promote the
general welfare of the community. He was
appointed District Clerk under General Hamilton
soon after the close of the war, served
until the time for the regular election, and
was then elected to that office. At the following
election he was defeated by only
twenty-five votes, which was a remarkable
race for a Union man, and, had he canvassed
the county, in all probabilities would have
been elected. While the canvass was in progress
he had gone with a drove of cattle to
Kansas.
Mr. Knight was married in December,
1861, to Miss Sarah C. Morrow, a daughter
of A. W. Morrow, of Georgetown. They
have seven children, namely: William W.,
who has served as Deputy Postmaster about
eight years, both in Georgetown and Abilene;
Eli, a stock raiser of Glasscock county, on the
extreme frontier, married Miss Ruth McGuire,
of Texas, and they have two children;
Mary wife of :Noble Fisk, of the same county,
and they have three children; Nannie, a grown

daughter at home; Ethel, who died December
3, 1890, aged sixteen years; and Anna and
Gladys attending school. Mr. and Mrs.
Knight are members of the Presbyterian
Church. Socially, Mr. Knight is a member
of Phil Sheridan Post, No. 25, G. A. R. He
takes but little interest in politics. He is one
of the pioneers of the county, and, although
not an old man, has lived to see wonderful
changes. He is a highly esteemed citizen,
whose friends are as numerous as his acquaintances,
and is a true man in every sense
of the word.
fI. KENNERLY, Postmaster at Giddings,
Tgxas, was born in Texas, on the
present site of Caldwell, then in Milam
county, January 17, 1831. His parents were
Everton and Susanah (Farner) Kennerly, the
former a native of Ireland, and the latter of
Virginia. His father came to America when
eight years of age and settled in Georgia.
His business was that of a farmer, and he
died about 1839, at the age of forty-two. He
had come with his wife to Texas in 1829,
when the present State was yet a part of
Mexico, and they made their first stopping
above Austin. He came in Haven's colony,
but, later, joined Austin's colony. The
mother died at Independence, Washington
county, in 1843.
The parents of the subject of this sketch
had four children; the eldest, Elizabeth, married
Enoch Martin, and both are now deceased,
she dying February 14, 1870, having -
been born January 6, 1829. Our subject
was the second of the family. The third was
Steven, who died at the age of fourteen; and
the fourth was Tacitus H., who married Mary
Palmer.

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819

Lewis Publishing Company, publisher. History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families. Chicago. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29785/. Accessed September 30, 2014.