History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families

HISTORY OF TEXAS.

reasonable time for this, May 23, Capta.n
Baylor, an ex-agent, at the head of 250 armed
men, marched to the Brazos reservation, with
the avowed intention of attacking the Indians.
Captain Plummer, of the First Infantry,
warned him to leave the reservation, and lihe
did so, but a skirmish occurred with the Indians,
and several on both sides were killed
and wounded.
It was now, therefore, certain that the Indians
could not remain on the reservation
they were then occupying. On the representations
of the agents, the government ordered
the removal of the Indians as soon as the
crops could be matured and gathered, but this
did not satisfy the hasty frontiersmen, who
demanded immediate action, and at the urgent
request of the supervising agent, R. S.
Neighbors, permission was given him to conduct
them at once beyond Red river. The
evil passions of the border whites were so
greatly aroused that the government had to
send troops to guard the imprisoned Indians
on their march to prevent massacre! Thus
guarded, these unfortunate Indians were escorted,
July 30 and August 1, to a reservation
on the Washita river, beyond the jurisdiction
of the State of Texas. The number
of Indians in this exodus was 1,415, of whom
380 were Comanches. Owing to the persistent
persecution kept up by the whites, it was
found impossible even to collect the cattle
which belonged to these Indians, and they
were therefore obliged to leave their stock behind!
As a climax to this practical illustration
of Lamar's principle of expulsion or extermination,
Superintendent Neighbors, having
returned to Texas in September, was waylaid
on the 14th near Fort Belknap by a man
unknown to him and shot! He died in twenty
minutes. It was believed 'that this crime was
committed on account of the free opinion ex

pressed by Neighbors relative to the killing
of a reserve Indian some time previously.
The last of the Alabama Indians were reported
in existence on the Trinity river, a few
miles east of the town of Livingston in 1869,
then about 200 or 300 in nillllber, and half
civilized.
'U Ii'ENT (OF L. , EN' .
While Elisha M. Pease was governor the
financial questions between the State and the
general Government were finally adjusted, and
a settlement made with the creditors of tlIe
cld Republic. But many new claimants arose
demanding indemnity from the United States
Government for loans and losses incurred during
the days of the Rlepublic in defending
the country against Indians from United
States territory. The general Government
offered a compromise, which was at first
treated very indignantly by the creditors, anl(
even by a majority of the citizens in a popular
vote on the subject. Tlhe legislature,
however, in later and cooler moments, agreed
to the compromise, and the creditors received
a pro rata, wlicll was about 78 per cent. Tlhe
amount thus paid was $2,750,000.
From 1852 to 1858 nine-tenths of the
taxes collected were remitted to the several
counties to enable them to build courthouses
and jails, the remaining tenth being set apart
by the constitution for the support of schools,
was paid into the treasury. During this
period very rapid progress was made, both in
immigration and assessable wealth.
But Texan animosity toward the Mexican
population did not abate. The Mexican inhabitants
were mostly of the lower orders,
and were charged with associating with 64 niggers,"
and frequently of stealing horses and
negro girls, whom they would take to Mexico.
In the fall of 1856 a formidable negro con.

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Lewis Publishing Company, publisher. History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families. Chicago. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29785/. Accessed September 21, 2014.