History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families

8 H

piracy was discovered in Colorado county,
which contemplated a simultaneous insurrection
and the massacre of the white population,
with the exception of their young
women, who were to be ilade captives. The
slaves had systematically organized, with
secret signs and pars-words, and provided
themselves with bowie-knives and a few firearms.
Their intention seemed to be to fight
their way into Mexico, which they called a
"' free State." On the detection of the conspiracy,
more than 200 negroes were severely
punished with the lash, two being whipped
to death, and three prominent leaders were
hanged September 5. It -was asserted that
every Mexican in the county was implicated
in this intended uprising, and they were ordered
to leave and never return, under penalty
of death. Similar measures were adopted
in Matagorda county.
THE CART WAR.
In 1857 Texan wagoners committed many
acts of violence upon Mexican cartmen in
the transportation of goods from San Antonio.
The freight rates were so low as to
drive the Texan wagoners from the field.
The latter, moreover, were not quite so faithful
as the Mexicans. Outrages became so
numerous and high-handed that General
Twiggs, the United States commander at San
Antonio, was compelled to furnish a military
escort to trains transporting Government supplies.
In October, the Mexican minister at
Washington addressed the United States Government
on the matter, stating that he had
been assured that the number of men thus
murdered was no less than seventy-five, and
that many Mexicans had been compelled to
fly to Mexico, in a state of destitution. In
November, Governor Pease addressed special

messages to the legislature on the matter,
stating that Mexican citizens engaged in the
business of teaming were not safe without a
military escort. As the counties in which
the deeds of violence were committed did
nothing to stop them, he suggested the propriety
of legislative interference. The senate
referred the matter to a committee, who reported
in favor of inflicting a penalty upon
those counties, but introduced no bill to that
effect, and so the matter ended. The legislature,
however, approved the action of the
governor in calling out a company of troops,
which, by the way, was ineffectual in regulating
a large section of country with the
criminals scattered over it. When the road
was abandoned by the Mexican cartmen and
booty became scarce, they began to commit
depredations on the property of the citizens.
The latter, though so indifferent to the rights
of the Mexicans previously, were now enraged
and resorted to lynching; and in the neighborhood
of Goliad the traveler would see
many a corpse suspended from the boughs of
the black oaks. The " Cart War" was thus
brought to an end.
POLITICAL PARTIES.
The gefteral political parties were not definitely
organized in Texas until during Pease's
administration. The party factions opposed
to each other previous to this differed only on
personal or local matters. After the annexation
the people naturally allied themselves
gradually with either the Whig or the Democratic
party, but took no zealous part in -their
issues for eight or ten years, on account of the
greater importance of local questions; these
settled, they began to become more decidedly
Whig or Democratic, with a far greater preponderance
on the Democratic side. Between

86

HISTOR Y OFTEXALYS.

Lewis Publishing Company, publisher. History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families. Chicago. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29785/. Accessed July 14, 2014.