History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families

A

HISTORY OF TEXAS.

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vote was known, which proved to be on the
5th. They, therefore, immediately assumed
the powers of government. It instructed its
delegates at Montgomery to ask for the admission
of Texas into the Southern Confederacy
that had just been formed; it sent a
committee to Governor Houston to inform
him of the change in the political position of
the State; it a optt.d the Confederate constitution,
and app tinted representatives to
tlhe Confederate congress. Dtiring the Conf.
d racy, Lewis T. Wigfll and William S.
Olidhaml represented Texas in the senate, and
John A. Wilcox, C. C. Herbert, Peter W.
Gray, B. F. Sexton, M. D. Graham, William
B. Wright, A M. Blanch, John R. Baylor,
S. H. Morgan, Stephen H. Derden and A.
P. Wiley in the house.
In his reply to the above convention Houston
said that that body had transcended its
powers, and that he would lay the whole
matter before the legislature, which was to
assemble on the 18th; whereupon the convention
defied his authority and passed an
ordinance requiring all State officers to take
the oath of allegiance to the new government.
Houston and E. W. Cave, secretary
of State, refused to take the oath, and they
were deposed by a decree of the convention,
and Edward Clark, lieutenant governor, was
installed as the executive. Houston then
appealed to the people, and when the legislature
met, sent to it a message protesting
against his removal, stating at the same time
that he could but await their action and that
of the people. He argued his case ably and
well before both the legislature and the people,
but the legislature sanctioned the acts of
the convention. Houston then retired to
private life. I
During these years Indian depredations contin
ned, and were more frequen t and daring after

Twiggs had surrendered all the United States
forces on the frontier to the Texans; and also
after the removal of the Indians from the
reservations in Young county the hostility of
the red savages was intensified. The more
peaceable Indians had been removed to a
great distance, while the more hostile were
next in proximity. There was one remarkable
exception. however, to the above observation:
A band of emigrants from the Creek
nation, consisting of Alabamas, Coshattas
and a few Muscogees, persevered in their
peacetul pursuits on Alabama creek, on the
side toward Trinity river, despite the frequent
depredations committed upon them by "mean
whites." As a community they set a model
example of industry, honesty, patience and
peaceableness.
While the northern and western frontier
was subjected to slily conducted forays by
the untutored savages, the southern borders
on the Rio Grande were afflicted with a more
open and formidable invasion by a Mexican
desperado named Cortina. IHe and his gang
had long been known for their frequent thefts
of cattle and other depredations. He and his
followers, by professing sympathy with the
persecuted Mexicans living in Texas, added
to their numbers until they had nearly 500,
and, like the old Mexican regime, began to
inaugurate a little rebellion against the government.
But booty was their principal object,
and they made their escapes the easier
by alternating in their operations between
Texas and Mexico, claiming while followed
in one country to be citizens of. the other.
The gang sometimes committed murder, as
for example in Brownsville, in September,
1859. On the 29th of that month he issued
a " proclamation" professing that his object
only was to protect persecuted Mexicans in
Texas, and that an organization had been

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Lewis Publishing Company, publisher. History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families. Chicago. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29785/. Accessed August 29, 2014.