Reminiscences of the boys in gray, 1861-1865 / compiled by Mamie Yeary.

Reminiscences of the Boys in Gray, 1861-1865. 53
Capt. McDonald was killed in the charge at Franklin and fell on the
breastworks. I saw a Yankee who was shot through. I only weighed 100
to 120 pounds, and he said, "little fellow shoot me." I told him I would not,
and he said he was bound to die and wanted to get out of his misery. "I will
give you everything I have. It will not be any sin." I told him I never
would, and left him. This was at Nashville. There was no firing and we
were all together. I was talking to the Yankees and was swapping them tobacco
for coffee. One said to me, "Little fellow, how long have you been
in the army?" I told him. "Were you ever wounded?" And when I said
no, he wanted to know the reason, and I told him it was on account of the
prayers of my mother. "Your bullets can't hit me," I said. "Do you believe
that?" he asked. I told him that I knew it. He said if he believed
that he would throw his gun down and go home. Many such scenes happened
all over the country.
After the armistice was out it was "Johnny Rebs to your holes" again.
After we had gone back to our works there were three lines advancing.
Mon. Rice and I were on the extreme left watching them advance. The
order was given to move. We did not know where they were going, as they
went east down behind the works. We had to make a run for it. I think
every man in the line shot at me. The bullets flew around all over me, but
not one touched my clothes.
There is much more that I could write, but perhaps this is enough. War
is just exactly what Gen. Sherman said it was-hell.
R. P. BENGE, Wolfe City, Tex.-Born July 22, 1839, near Somerville,
Fayette County, Tennessee. Enlisted in the Confederate Army April 1.9,
1861, at Marshall, Tex., as a private. Was in Company F, Second Texas
Regiment. First Captain was S. J. Richardson; first Colonel was John R.
Ford. The first year was on the frontier of Texas and re-enlisted at San
Antonio, Tex., April 19, 1862, and sent East. Was wounded at Chickamauga
in the arm: Was captured at Arkansas Post on Jan. 11, 1863, and
sent to Camp Butler, Ill. Was exchanged April 15, 1863, at City Point, Va.,
from there I was sent to the Army of Tennessee, to Col. R. Q. Mills' Tenth
Texas Regiment and Gen. Granbury's brigade, Gen. Cheatham's division.
Was in the battles of Arkansas Post, Chickamauga, Missionary Ridge,
Ringold Gap. Was detailed at army headquarters, January, 1864, as scout,
in which capacity I served until the close of the war. Was paroled at Saulsberry,
N. C., April 27, 1865.
W. L. BENGE, Wolfe City, Texas.-Born June 1, 1837, near Somerville,
Fayette County, Tenn. Enlisted in the Confederate Army at Sherman,
Texas, as private in Company F, Ninth Texas Regiment, Gen. Ross' Brigade,
Gen. McIntosh's Division, Trans-Mississippi Department. My first
Captain was named Duncan and first Colonel was named Sims. Was dismounted
and sent to Corinth, Miss., in 1862. Was there through the entire
siege.. Returned to Corinth in October, 1862, and participated in the
second battle and was remounted after the battle. I was fortunate enough
to escape without a wound and was never captured, for which I am very
thankful. At Holly Springs my horse was killed from under me. My Captain,
Wayne Cotton, was killed here and many other good friends. Was
also at the battle of Yazoo, Miss. Was transferred to Tennessee, and was
at the battle of Thompson's Station. Was then transferred back to Mississippi
and detailed as scout under Capt. Evans till close of the war. Surrendered
at Canton, Miss., in May, 1865.

Yeary, Mamie. Reminiscences of the boys in gray, 1861-1865 / compiled by Mamie Yeary.. Dallas, Tex.. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29786/. Accessed September 17, 2014.