[The Mineral Wells Bottling Works]

Description:

A number of the early mineral water wells bottled their product and sold it nationwide for its reputed health benefits. The name of this particular well, associated with this turn-of-the-20th-century endeavor, is not identified. It may well have been the inventor of the bottled water industry. This photograph shows what has been tentatively identified as a threshing machine, driven by a steam-powered tractor, parked outside the plant. This bottling plant also produced "Country Red" and "Cream soda" in 1906. J.L. Tipton is shown, fourth from the left. The other men remain unidentified. The photograph dates from 1912.
This bottling company also bottled "Country Red" and "Cream soda" in 1912. J.L. Tipton is shown, fourth from the left. The other men remain unidentified.
Later development of a crystallizing process eliminated the substantial cost of shipping water, and adversely affected the bottled water industry. The concentrated crystals greatly expanded the distribution of the beneficial minerals inherent in the water, and created an industry of its own. However, it led to legal problems occasioned by the limited supply of crystals, and attempts to satisfy a voracious market.
What appears to be a scar across the photograph indicates that the original picture was probably damaged, and was repaired by Mr. Weaver for the making of a duplicate photograph.

Creator(s): Unknown
Location(s): United States - Texas - Palo Pinto County - Mineral Wells
Creation Date: 1900?  
Partner(s):
Boyce Ditto Public Library
Collection(s):
A. F. Weaver Collection
Usage:
Total Uses: 154
Past 30 days: 0
Yesterday: 0
Creator:
Unknown
Date(s):
  • Creation: 1900?
  • Digitized: May 30, 2008
Coverage:
Place
United States - Texas - Palo Pinto County - Mineral Wells
Era
New South, Populism, Progressivism, and the Great Depression, 1877-1939
Date
1900?  
Description:

A number of the early mineral water wells bottled their product and sold it nationwide for its reputed health benefits. The name of this particular well, associated with this turn-of-the-20th-century endeavor, is not identified. It may well have been the inventor of the bottled water industry. This photograph shows what has been tentatively identified as a threshing machine, driven by a steam-powered tractor, parked outside the plant. This bottling plant also produced "Country Red" and "Cream soda" in 1906. J.L. Tipton is shown, fourth from the left. The other men remain unidentified. The photograph dates from 1912.
This bottling company also bottled "Country Red" and "Cream soda" in 1912. J.L. Tipton is shown, fourth from the left. The other men remain unidentified.
Later development of a crystallizing process eliminated the substantial cost of shipping water, and adversely affected the bottled water industry. The concentrated crystals greatly expanded the distribution of the beneficial minerals inherent in the water, and created an industry of its own. However, it led to legal problems occasioned by the limited supply of crystals, and attempts to satisfy a voracious market.
What appears to be a scar across the photograph indicates that the original picture was probably damaged, and was repaired by Mr. Weaver for the making of a duplicate photograph.

Language(s):
Subject(s):
Partner:
Boyce Ditto Public Library
Collection:
A. F. Weaver Collection
Identifier:
  • LOCAL-CONT-NO: AWO_1821P
  • ARK: ark:/67531/metapth38079
Resource Type: Photograph
Format: Image
Rights:
Access: Public