[The Entrance to Camp Wolters]

Description:

Found on page 158 of "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells" by A. F. Weaver, the caption to this picture reads, "Entrance to the original Camp Wolters around the 1930's. This entrance was located near and behind the present National Guard Armory."
The Texas National Guard 112th Cavalry Service Troop maintained an armory on West Mountain, from a time before 1923. The hill itself was dubbed "Cavalry Hill." The Service Troop was later re-named 124th Cavalry, Troop F--which attained to fame as part of the task force that cleared the Burma Road in World War II.
Camp Wolters was built for summer training of the Texas National Guard in 1927. It was to be used for a minimum of three weeks each year. The famous CCC (The Civilian Conservation Corps) stayed in the camp in 1930, and built several of the rock structures in the camp--and also around Mineral Wells.
The original site had sen many uses: It was a P.O.W. camp for German prisoners taken during World War II; it was Texas National Guard property; and it was later given over to commercial use. An embedded star that was once on the headquarters of the parade ground of the original camp (now on the propery of Mineral Wells High School) is still visited by those who were stationed there--and by those World War II prisoners who were interned in Mineral Wells. The Texas Historical Commission recognizes its significance with a marker.
The "new" Camp Wolters was located farther east in 1941. It has also had many uses: The U.S. Army IRTC; (Infantry Replacement Training Center) in World War II; Wolters Air Force Base in the early 1950's. It was returned to the army in 1956, and re-named Fort Wolters in 1963. It was the U.S. Army Primary Helicopter School (USAPHS)during the Vietnam War in 1966.
The entrance to the original Camp Wolters was constructed of native sandstone with red-clay-tile roofs. Part of the property was distributed to Mineral Wells and Weatherford after Fort Wolters was decommissioned following the Vietnam War.

Creator(s): Unknown
Location(s): United States - Texas - Palo Pinto County - Mineral Wells
Creation Date: 1935?  
Partner(s):
Boyce Ditto Public Library
Collection(s):
A. F. Weaver Collection
Usage:
Total Uses: 429
Past 30 days: 18
Yesterday: 0
Creator:
Unknown
Date(s):
  • Creation: 1935?
  • Digitized: May 30, 2008
Coverage:
Place
United States - Texas - Palo Pinto County - Mineral Wells
Era
Into Modern Times, 1939-Present
Date
1935?  
Description:

Found on page 158 of "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells" by A. F. Weaver, the caption to this picture reads, "Entrance to the original Camp Wolters around the 1930's. This entrance was located near and behind the present National Guard Armory."
The Texas National Guard 112th Cavalry Service Troop maintained an armory on West Mountain, from a time before 1923. The hill itself was dubbed "Cavalry Hill." The Service Troop was later re-named 124th Cavalry, Troop F--which attained to fame as part of the task force that cleared the Burma Road in World War II.
Camp Wolters was built for summer training of the Texas National Guard in 1927. It was to be used for a minimum of three weeks each year. The famous CCC (The Civilian Conservation Corps) stayed in the camp in 1930, and built several of the rock structures in the camp--and also around Mineral Wells.
The original site had sen many uses: It was a P.O.W. camp for German prisoners taken during World War II; it was Texas National Guard property; and it was later given over to commercial use. An embedded star that was once on the headquarters of the parade ground of the original camp (now on the propery of Mineral Wells High School) is still visited by those who were stationed there--and by those World War II prisoners who were interned in Mineral Wells. The Texas Historical Commission recognizes its significance with a marker.
The "new" Camp Wolters was located farther east in 1941. It has also had many uses: The U.S. Army IRTC; (Infantry Replacement Training Center) in World War II; Wolters Air Force Base in the early 1950's. It was returned to the army in 1956, and re-named Fort Wolters in 1963. It was the U.S. Army Primary Helicopter School (USAPHS)during the Vietnam War in 1966.
The entrance to the original Camp Wolters was constructed of native sandstone with red-clay-tile roofs. Part of the property was distributed to Mineral Wells and Weatherford after Fort Wolters was decommissioned following the Vietnam War.

Language(s):
Subject(s):
Partner:
Boyce Ditto Public Library
Collection:
A. F. Weaver Collection
Identifier:
  • LOCAL-CONT-NO: AWO_1740N
  • ARK: ark:/67531/metapth38085
Resource Type: Photograph
Format: Image
Rights:
Access: Public