Texas Heritage, Spring 1984

Visit Brazoria County
and See Our Historical Sites

MASONIC OAK It was under this tree that
five prominent colonists met in 1835 to organize
the first Masonic Lodge in Texas. Masons
from all over the state revere this tree and often
have meetings under its branches.

Underwood I louse

THE UNDERWOOD HOUSE A restored 1835
house, perhaps the oldest frame house still
standing in Texas. The original portion, a twostory
log house was built by colonist Thomas
W. Nibbs. It was acquired and enlarged by
Ammon Underwood in 1838, and Underwoods
lived in the house for over a hundred
years. It has been restored by the First Capital
Historical Foundation and is open to the public
by appointment.
THE LOG CABIN An original slave cabin,
dating back to about 1850, brought from the
John Sweeny Plantation and placed in the
rear of the Underwood house. It has been
restored and furnished as an early Texas
kitchen.
THE REPLICA A full-sized, exact replica of
the building where the first House of Representatives
of the Republic met.
THE SALT KETTLE This huge cast-iron
kettle in front of the Replica was used in the
early days for making salt, basically a salt
water evaporation process.
THE WEST COLUMBIA CEMETERY Site
given by the Josiah H. Bell family, has graves
of many early colonists and heroes of the
Texas Revolution. The oldest grave is that of
Angeline Caldwell Kerr, born in Kentucky on
Feb. 8, 1802 and died in Brazoria on June 7,
1825. She was the wife of prominent colonist
James Kerr for whom Kerr County is named.
VARNER-HOGG PLANTATION HOUSE
AND GROUNDS Restored plantation house,
beautifully furnished with antiques. Open to
the public for regular tours, the house and
grounds are now a state park.

GULF PRAIRIE CEMETERY Originally the
Perry family burial ground. Stephen F. Austin
was buried in this beautiful little cemetery.
The body was moved to the State Cemetery
in Austin in 1910. Only the empty tomb
remains.
OLD BRAZORIA CEMETERY Site set aside
by Mexican authorities in 1827 as a cemetery
for Catholics but open to all residents as the
colonists were required to be members of the
Catholic Church, the state religion of Mexico.
STATUE OF HENRY SMITH Life-sized
statue of early settler who was active in the
political affairs of the colony. (See "Giants of
Early Texas''). Henry Smith was married
three times and all of his wives were sisters.
STEPHEN F. AUSTIN'S BEDROOM AND
OFFICE These restored rooms, which were
set aside for Austin's use, are all that remain of
the Peach Point Plantation house, the rest having
been destroyed in storms of the early
1900's. Many Perry and Austin family relics
are on display.

Masonic Oak

McCROSKY (McCLOSKY) CABIN
This restored log cabin is said to date
back to 1824, making it the oldest structure
still standing in the county.

Stephen F. Austin's bedroom and office

Varner-1 logg Plantation

Brazoria County Historical Commission

Gael

7

Texas Historical Foundation. Texas Heritage, Spring 1984. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth45446/. Accessed April 21, 2014.