The Laws of Texas, 1822-1897 Volume 1

26

Laws, Orders and Contracts

I have just received its resolution, to which I have conformed; it is
of the following tenor:"
"It will be very expedient to grant the permission solicited by M/oses
Austin, that the three hundred families, which he says are desirous to
do so, should remove and settle in the province of Texas, but under the
conditions indicated in his petition on the subject, presented to the
governor of that province, and which your lordship (usia) transmitted
to this department, with your official letter of the 16th instant. Therefore,
if to the first or principal requisite of being catholics, or agreeing
to become so, before entering the Spanish territory, they also add that
of accrediting their good character and habits, as is offered in said petition,
and taking the necessary oath to be obedient in all things to the
government; to take up arms in its defence against all kinds of enemies;
and to be faithful to the king; and to observe the political constitution of
the Spanish monarchy; the most flattering hopes may be formed, that
the said province will receive an important augmentation, in agriculture,
industry, and arts, by the new emigrants, who will introduce them;
which is all that this deputation have to say, in reply to your lordship's
aforementioned official letter."
"And I transcribe it to your lordship, for your information and corresponding
effects, that you may cause the interested person to be informed
thereof, by means of a person of your confidence, who you will
despatch with an express; and you will at the same time, send in by
said express, some copies of the decree, which I transmitted under date
of yesterday, granting a pardon and amnesty to the Spanish refugees,
who are on the frontier, in order that they may be restored to the bosom
of their country. God preserve your lorclship many years. Monterey,
17th January, 1821. Joaquin de Arredondo. To the governor of the
province of Texas."
All of which I transcribe to you, for your information and satisfaction,
in answer to your petition, for which purpose, and in order to
inform you of the deliberations of the most excellent deputation of
these provinces, I have despatched with this, a person of my confidence,
who is citizen Don Erasmo Seguin; and after having arranged
for the removal of said families, which vou have contracted with me,
it will be important for you to direct, that when said families come on,
information shall be immediately given of the time of their arrival,
and the place where they have stopped in this territory; and that yoi
then come on in company with my said commissioner, in order that we
may agree as to the place or places, where they may wish to establish
themselves; so that I may go on there, and delineate the town, and apportion
out the lands, agreeably to the families, and species of agriculture
they intend to establish; and also to receive from them the beforementioned
oath, in order that they may be from that time considered, as
members united to the Spanish nation, and enter upon the enjoyment
of the benefits which it extends, and concedes to its citizens and to
Spaniards.
I also expect from the prudence which your deportment demonstrates,
and for your own prosperity and tranquility, that all the families vou
introduce, shall be honest and industrious, in order that idleness and vice
may not pervert the good and meritorious, who are worthy of Spanish
esteem, and of the protection of this government, which will be extended
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Gammel, Hans Peter Mareus Neilsen. The Laws of Texas, 1822-1897 Volume 1. Austin, Texas. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth5872/. Accessed July 10, 2014.