The Laws of Texas, 1822-1897 Volume 1

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Laws, Orders and Contracts

ART. 43. The municipal expenses, and all other others which may be
considered necessary, or of common utility to the new towns, shall be
proposed to the governor, by the ayuntamientos through the political
chief, accompanied with a plan of the taxes arbitrios, which in their
opinion may be just and best calculated to raise them, and should the
proposed plan be approved by the governor, he shall order it to be executed,
subject however to the resolution of the legislature, to whom it
shall be immediately passed with his report and that of the political
chief, who will say whatever occurs to him on the subject.
ART. 44. For the opening and improving of roads and other public
works in Texas, the government will transmit to the chief of that department
the individuals who, in other parts of the state, may have
been sentenced to public works as vagrants, or for other crimes, these
same persons may be employed by individuals for competent wages, and
as soon as the time of their condemnation is expired, they can unite
themselves as colonists to any new settlement, and obtain the corresponding
lands, if their reformation shall have made them worthy of
such favor in the opinion of the chief of the department, without whose
certificate they shall not be admitted.
ART. 45. The government in accord with the respective ordinary
ecclesiastics, will take care to provide the new settlements with the
competent number of pastors, and, in accord with the same authority,
shall propose to the legislature for its approbation, the salary which the
said pastors are to receive, which shall be paid by the new settlers.
ART. 46. The new settlers as regards the introduction of slaves, shall
subject themselves to the existing laws, and those which may hereafter
be established on the subject.
ART. 47. The petitions now pending relative to the subject of tlis
law, shall be despatched in conformity with it, and for this purpose,
they shall be passed to the governor, and the families who may be established
within the limits of the state, without having any land assigned
them, shall subject themselves to this law, and to the orders of the
supreme government of the Union, with respect to those who are within
twenty leagues of the limits of the United States of America, and ten
leagues in a straight line of the coast of the Gulf of Mexico.
ART. 48. This law shall be published in all the villages of the state,
and that it may arrive at the notice of all others throughout the Mexican
confederation, it shall be communicated to their respective legislatures,
by the secretary of this state; and the governor will take particular
care to send a certified copy of it, in compliance with the 161st article
of the federal constitution, to the two houses of congress, and the supreme
executive power of the nation, with a request to the latter to
give it general circulation through foreign states, by means of your
ambassadors.
The governor pro tem. of the state will cause it to be published and
circulated.-Saltillo, 24th March, 1825.-Signed,
RAFAEL RAMOS Y VALDEZ, President.
JUAN VICENTE GAMPOS, Member and Sec'y.
JOSE JOAQUIN ARCE ROSALES, Member and Sec'y.
Therefore, I command all authorities, as well civil as military and
ecclesiastical, to obey, and cause to be obeyed, the present decree in all
its parts. RAFAEL GONZALES, Governor.
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Gammel, Hans Peter Mareus Neilsen. The Laws of Texas, 1822-1897 Volume 1. Austin, Texas. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth5872/. Accessed August 20, 2014.