Texas in 1850. By Melinda Rankin.

CHAPTER II.
Texas compared with other States. Inducements for the Emigration
of the Farmer and Mechanic. Prospect and Encouragement of
the Emigrant. Improvements. Natural Scenery. Flowers. Physical
Resources. State of Society. Moral Institutions. Prosperity
of the Temperance Cause.
AN impartial observer of the comparative merits of
Texas with the older States, might, with much propriety,
recommend it as presenting advantages worthy the
attention of the adventurous and enterprising. The
fertile lands with which the State abounds, offer, perhaps,
greater encouragement than any other department
of enterprise; hence, the emigrant who turns his
attention to the cultivation of the soil is undoubtedly
making the wisest selection. This being an inexhaustible
source of wealth can be relied on with greater
confidence than any other.
The acquisition of industrious and enterprising occuTants
of the productive soil of Texas, would do more in
advancing the state in wealth and independence than
any other means, and would, undoubtedly, in the course
of a few years, advance her in importance before any
other Southern State.
Present appearances indicate that her extensive forests
and beautiful wide-spread prairies shall not long
remain uncultivated. Scarcely a day passes which
does not bring more or less persons who are seeking

Rankin, Melinda. Texas in 1850. By Melinda Rankin.. Boston. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth6107/. Accessed October 31, 2014.