Texas in 1850. By Melinda Rankin.

22

TEXAS IN 1850.

homes in Texas. The emigrant's wagon and train is a
sight of such common occurrence, that it scarcely excites
a passing notice. Several in succession are frequently
seen.
It is not an inferior order of citizens who come to
Texas. Men of wealth, talent and influence compose
the more recent class of emigration, who are well calculated
to advance the interests of a new and growing
State.
Persons of industrious and temperate habits will be
successful in any honorable occupation. Mechanics, of
all the various kinds, are essentially needed; and would
not fail of being amply compensated, in leaving older
settled States and emigrating to a new one, where a
scarcity in every department exists. As every thing
is of the progressive order in Texas, the new settler has
much to anticipate, and the hope of a better state of
things in prospect has a tendency to reconcile him to
present inconveniences.
He may, probably, realize some privations of comfort,
but whoever comes to Texas with reasonable expectar
tions, will not be liable to disappointment. And here
it may be proper to observe, that persons emigrating to
a new country should not indulge in such exalted expectations
as is too frequently the case with those who
become dissatisfied.
They should duly count the cost, and not speculate
too extensively in imagination. Though difficulties and
discouragements often cast their darkening shadowst
yet, he who keeps his eye upon the star of hope, will

Rankin, Melinda. Texas in 1850. By Melinda Rankin.. Boston. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth6107/. Accessed July 31, 2014.