Texas in 1850. By Melinda Rankin.

28

TEXAS IN 1850.

the offender was protected by the citizens. Where those
cases of moral depravity are at present, whether metamorphosed
into virtuous citizens, or emigrated beyond
the limits of Texas, is a matter of curiosity. Crime is
no more common than in the older States, and, as the
State has now a penitentiary, a rigid intolerance is
expected, afid a strict retribution will be exacted of those
who transgress her laws.
Societies and institutions which have for their object
moral reform, are encouraged, and becoming common
throughout the State.
The hallowed influence of the " Sons of Temperance"
has spread its blissful light, and the strong armed foe of
intemperance is fast losing ground in Texas. The last
year has witnessed an interesting change. Nothing
has ever yet occurred in Texas more significant -of her
future weal, than the manner in which public sentiment
has been operated upon, in regard to the importance of
this institution. But about eighteen months ago the
first Division was instituted; now there is scarcely a
town in the state which has not followed the example.
It is a fact worthy of notice, that nothing is done imperfectly
in Texas; if an object receives attention at all,
the people enter into the spirit of it with an enthusiastic
devotion. The temperance cause has struck upon
the right chord, and, if perseveringly adhered to, its
advent may be hailed as the harbinger of every other
good thing with which a country can be blessed.
Wherever this cause prevails, vice and immorality
vanish like dew before the morning sun, and peace and
prosperity follow in happy succession.

Rankin, Melinda. Texas in 1850. By Melinda Rankin.. Boston. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth6107/. Accessed August 28, 2014.