Texas in 1850. By Melinda Rankin.

TEXAS IN 1850.

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rallied and brought into exercise before sympathy from
abroad can be enlisted in her behalf.
Plans must be devised and executed commensurate
with the great end in view; it is wisdom to select the
best means for the accomplishment of purposes in
which the highest interests of a country are concerned.
If the prosperity of a country outruns its Religious and
Literary institutions, its elevation will be of short continuance.
These institutions must be sustained in Texas
to perpetuate her prosperity, and it is the highest point
of wisdom in the prosecution of a work so important, to
enter upon it with a spirit suitable to the object, and to
secure the most powerful co-operative influences.
The preaching of the Gospel is heaven's consecrated
instrumentality in disseminating those principles by
which society can alone be sustained. Much destitution
yet exists in regard to the stated preaching of the
Word; the harvest in many places is ripe, but there
are no laborers to enter in. The church in Texas is yet
weak, but it is evident that there is more lack of action
and efficiency than means in sustaining the institutions
of the Gospel. That aid is not extended in supporting
the ministry which the faithful dispensation of the Gospel
requires. Ministers poorly supported, and dependent
upon their own resources, are necessarily obliged
to turn their attention to secular employments; consequently,
they cannot dispense the Gospel with that
ability and success which an exclusive devotion to the
cause would enable them to do. The present period
requires singleness of heart and purpose in the minis

Rankin, Melinda. Texas in 1850. By Melinda Rankin.. Boston. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth6107/. Accessed July 10, 2014.