Texas in 1850. By Melinda Rankin.

TEXAS IN 1850.

35

will not be appreciated, nor will he have that support
to which he is entitled by the decree of heaven.
A blessing attends the preaching of God's word where
it is sustained according to gospel principles, and no
Christian duty is more strongly enjoined upon the
church than liberal appropriations for that purpose.
" The Lord loveth a cheerful giver." " There is
that scattereth, and yet increaseth; there is that withholdeth
more than is meet, and it tendeth to poverty.
In a country like Texas it is pre-eminently important
that the minister should receive an adequate support.
In the first place, his labors are of the most arduous
kind, such as are calculated to dishearten and dispirit
the most resolute ; and, ai(d on the part of the people
would be a demonstration of their sympathy, which
would have a tendency to encourage him, greatly, in
his laborious calling. In the second place, society is in
a forming state, and requires great skill and efficiency
in dispensing the word of God, in such a manner as
will be adapted to the wants of a people made up
of every variety of sentiment. It is absolutely necessary
that the minister be thoroughly prepared and
properly furnished, to enable him to dispense the word
of life in a manner by which the gospel may be
honored.
It may be regarded a wise arrangement of Providence
which imposes this duty on man. By contributing
to the support of the gospel a deeper interest is felt
in its ministrations, and in many instances operates as
an inducement'for persons to attend the ordinances of

Rankin, Melinda. Texas in 1850. By Melinda Rankin.. Boston. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth6107/. Accessed September 23, 2014.