Texas in 1850. By Melinda Rankin.

TEXAS 1N 1850.

43

and are desirous of finding locations of extensive usefulness,
could not fail of meeting with abundant success in
Texas.
Who among the highly favored of New England's
products will come and cultivate the rich soil of Texan
mind? The individual enterprise of intelligent and
self-sacrificing teachers is demanded in behalf of educating
the youth of this interesting and important State.
Are there not those who will volunteer their services to
advance an object so important as this ? A moral and
intellectual influence would pour forth its genial rays,
did New England feel and act as her means warrant
her to do. Would her seminaries and literary institutions
send more of their educated sons and daughters
abroad, great good would be the result.
An important obligation imposes itself upon the North
to aid the educational interests of the South. The alliance
of common interest demands a co-operation in
Promoting those institutions which have for their object
the general good. The educational interests of the United
States, as a whole, should be taken into consideration;
and those States which have long felt the benign influence
of science and literature, should feel themselves
bound by duty and obligation to extend those influences
ito less favored portions of country.
No person reared and matured amid the institutions
of the North can conscientiously disregard the duty of
rlparting an influence which may be felt for good in
less favored portions of the Union. It becomes neces8ary
for the different parts, to prompt, encourage and
aid each other in matters of general interest.

Rankin, Melinda. Texas in 1850. By Melinda Rankin.. Boston. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth6107/. Accessed July 4, 2015.