Texas in 1850. By Melinda Rankin.

TEXAS IN 1850.

51

may scoff at the assumption, but posterity will find it
true. In the Gospel of Christ, Texas is safe; out of
it, she is undone. If Texiansdesire to make their State
truly great, and transmit to posterity institutions in
primitive simplicity and force, they must imbue the
minds of youth with a pure and elevated morality,
which shall induce to habits of right action. The mind
and heart of the child may be as certainly formed for
good works by moral training, as the plant may be improved
by careful culture. Though we would yield due
honor to literature and science, we must not expect
from them, what they are not able to perform. They
must not be relied on as adequate for controlling the
will and purifying the heart.
For education to answer its great end it must be
evangelized. We cannot look to denominational enterprises
to accomplish this work. Prejudices would debar
the attempt of inoculating with any particular creed.
Though denominational enterprises of an educational
character are not to be disparaged, yet they cannot be
relied on, as being sufficient to meet the demand of a
people, as various in sentiment as are found in Texas.
While we look to our literary institutions to educate
the intellect, the more elevated training of a religious
education is found in the Sabbath School. There it is
entirely free from sectarian influence. Facts and results,
plainly show the necessity, adaptation and usefulness
of such a specific agent in advancing the interests
of Texian evangelization, and the promotion of Christian
education among all classes. The missionary opera

Rankin, Melinda. Texas in 1850. By Melinda Rankin.. Boston. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth6107/. Accessed December 21, 2014.