Texas in 1850. By Melinda Rankin.

TEXAS IN 1850.

55

Replenish her with the means, and no doubt she
might prove an engine of moral power before which
Catholicism would have to shrink. Let Texas stand
beside Mexico, highly evangelized, and the contrast
would serve to show the superiority of the Protestant
over the Catholic religion; the tendency of which
would be to constrain the degraded Mexicans to yield
to the influence of that system of faith, which might
elevate them to the like happy condition.
Let Texas then be the rallying point around which
influences of good shall be formed, and a weapon
sharper than a two edged sword shall be unsheathed in
Mexico, which shall pierce her false religion to the seat
of life.
In order to render Texas an efficient agent, it will
require the co-operation of Christians at home and
abroad. High ground must be taken, and maintained
with firmness and decision. The pioneers of the cause
of truth must take their stand upon the high table land
of promise, and fix their eye upon the moral grandeur
of the object, until their energies become enlisted, to
concentrate them with power and might for its full accomplishment.
Texan Christians are, in a very important
manner, placea where they must labor. So near
allied to their own interests, is the moral condition of
Mexico, that its elevation seems necessary to their own.
Their proximity renders it apparent, that the moral
condition of the one will evidently affect the other.
The baleful effects of Mexican influence must be counteracted
and overcome, and Christians must buckle on

Rankin, Melinda. Texas in 1850. By Melinda Rankin.. Boston. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth6107/. Accessed July 29, 2014.