Texas in 1850. By Melinda Rankin.

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TEXAS IN 1850.

devotion, and the highest manifestation of both: so no
other on this continent, none in modern or in ancient
times, since the meeting of the Disciples, when ' endowed
from on high with the Holy Ghost and with
tounges of flame,' have sent forth results so valuable
to mankind, as have come out of this decision to remain
firm on the rock in the wilderness. That was the
embryo bud, from which there has grown out three
branches, large and growing rapidly with command
from God to fill the whole earth, and it must be done.
The branches are, a free conscience Bible in worship,
free schools in education, and free suffrage in government.
The last, to succeed, must be associated with
the two first. But let the free Bible and free schools
prevail and we need little anxiety what form government
may have. The want of education to every child
and the Bible read daily by every person of the nation,
is the danger into which we are now passing.
" To use the language of a distinguished orator, liberally
modified, 'If we seek for great men in the ends for
which they set forth, the difficulties with which they
contended, the success which God gave them, the teeming
harvest which has sprung from seed sown with their
tears, we shall find them in the first church of the Pilgrims;
and our interest in them must be inexpressibly
heightened by their relations to our own present and
future, in which they have expanded, and through
whose light they shine. Certainly, the planting of a
colony in a new world, which may grow, and does grow
to a great nation where there was none before, is in

Rankin, Melinda. Texas in 1850. By Melinda Rankin.. Boston. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth6107/. Accessed February 8, 2016.