Texas in 1850. By Melinda Rankin.

TEXAS IN 1850.

99

This is a small place, of some importance, however,
on account of its situation in regard to the river. The
Sabine River is navigable for tolerably sized steamboats,
and by becoming cleared of some difficulties
which now obstruct its navigation, it might be rendered
highly important to the commercial interests of Eastern
Texas. The town of Sabine has the appearance of
being somewhat of a business place, and evidently
possesses a good degree of respectability.
The religious and educational interests are fluctuating,
nothing of permanency is enjoyed. Schools are
only occasional, as well as preaching of the Gospel.
A few miles west of Sabine, is the town of Milam,
the shire town of Sabine County. Being a country seat,
it might be inferred that a place of imposing consequence
would present itself to the eye of the stranger. A person
coming into Texas, direct from the Northern
States might, perhaps, be surprised upon seeing many
places called towns in Texas. He would, probably, as
has been frequently the case, inquire, " where is the
town? " and it would require some experience to become
reconciled to the idea, that a post-office, store, and
a few dwellings could, with propriety, be called a town.
It might not be an absurd idea, to suggest that no
place should acquire the appellation of " town," without
its possessing church and school buildings, which
might present inducements for an earlier attention to
those appendages, which constitute the principal ornament
of town, city, or country.
It must be admitted that Texas towns are somewhat

Rankin, Melinda. Texas in 1850. By Melinda Rankin.. Boston. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth6107/. Accessed September 18, 2014.