History of the revolution in Texas, particularly of the war of 1835 & '36; together with the latest geographical, topographical, and statistical accounts of the country, from the most authentic sources. Also, an appendix. By the Rev. C. Newell.

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APPENDIX.

San Jacinto, was found stuck in the ground; the hilt, valued at
$7000, had been broken off by some one who had been careful to
secure and secrete so valuable a prize.
Santa Anna, it is said, wore in his shirt three studs, valued at
$1700 each; upon these was written his name, in parts, as follows:
Antonio-Lopez de-Santa Anna. His camp furniture
was exceedingly rich and splendid; he had silver tea urns, silver
cream pots; splendid china ware, marked in monograms; rich cut
glass tumblers and decanters, the latter with stoppers mounted
with gold; and almost every thing compatible with a camp which
could contribute to comfort and luxury.
No. 2.-Exposition made by the Ayuntamiento and Inhabitants of
Austin's Colony, explanatory of the late commotions, and ad.
hering to the plan of Santa Anna. Adopted July 27th, 1832.
The causes of the late disturbances are plain to every person
who resides in Texas, or is informed of the events which have
transpired here since the commencement of the year 1830; but as
those causes have never been laid before the Mexican people, it is
necessary and proper that it should now be done, as a justification
of the course taken by a large and respectable portion of the inhabitants,
and also as explanatory of the reasons which have impel.
led the Ayuntamiento and the inhabitants of this Colony unanimously
to adhere to the plan of Vera Cruz.
From the time when a national and state law invited persons of
all nations to come and settle in the wilderness of Texas, duties
and rights were established between those who govern and those
who were to obey in virtue of them. Those laws and the general
and state constitutions have clearly designated the guarantees
which secure the citizens from the caprice and the arbitrary will of
the subaltern authorities. But, unfortunately, since the present
Administration went into power, an uninterrupted series of depredations,
calumnies and injustice, has been the recompense received
by the citizens of Texas, for their firm adhesion to the Mexican
Republic and to the Federal system by which it is governed. The
civil authorities have been viewed by the military as mere subalterns,
to be commanded as a corporal commands a soldier. This
military power, under the authority of the superior chief, has disregarded
all the rights which the constitution secures to free citizens,
and has wished to subject every thing to its enslaving influence.
The Government of the State of Coahuila and Texas has
not exercised in these Colonies any more power than what the
superior military chief has been pleased to grant as a favor.
To enumerate in detail all the violations of the constitution and

Newell, Chester. History of the revolution in Texas, particularly of the war of 1835 & '36; together with the latest geographical, topographical, and statistical accounts of the country, from the most authentic sources. Also, an appendix. By the Rev. C. Newell.. New York. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth6109/. Accessed September 2, 2014.