History of the revolution in Texas, particularly of the war of 1835 & '36; together with the latest geographical, topographical, and statistical accounts of the country, from the most authentic sources. Also, an appendix. By the Rev. C. Newell.

APPENDIX.

199

laws, and attacks upon the rights of the State of Coahuila and
Texas, which have been committed by the military authority,
would occupy more time and space than the present occasion will
admit; only a few of the leading ones will, therefore, be mention.
ed, which have had a direct influence in producing the late disturbances.
First-On the 22d April, 1828, concessions of land were made
in conformity with the colonization laws by the President of the
nation, Don Guadalupe Victoria, and the Governor of this State,
to the inhabitants established East of the San Jacinto, and in the
district of Nacogdoches. In the year 1830, Don Francisco Madero
was appointed by the Governor a Commissioner to survey the
said land, and issue the titles in due form of law to said settlers.
He arrived on the Trinity river in the month of January, 1831, and
had made some progress in the discharge of his duties, when he
and his surveyor, Jose Maria Carbajal, were arrested by Col. Juan
Davis Bradburn, Military Commandant of Anahuac, and conducted
to that post as prisoners. The only reason given by said
Commandant for this direct and insulting attack upon the constitution
and sovereignty of the State of Coahuila and Texas, was,
that the arrest of Madero was in obedience to the orders of his Excellency
the Commandant, Gen. Don Manuel de Mier y Teran.
Similar orders were issued for the arrest of Madero to Col. Don
Jose de las Peidras, Commandant of the frontier at Nacogdoches.
His Excellency the Governor of the State speaks of this affair in
his message to the Legislature, at the opening of the session on
the 2d January last, in the following words, as translated:
" The public tranquillity has not been disturbed in any part of
the State, although Col. Davis Bradburn assumed the power without
the knowledge of this Government, to arrest a commissioner
appointed by it to survey vacant lands and issue titles,-which act
might have caused a commotion; but nothing of the kind occurred,
owing to the prudence of the arrested person, and of the citizens
who were to have received titles for lands, and who, by this
event, were deprived for the time being from obtaining legal possession
of their property. This Government endeavored to ascertain
the cause of this interference, and for that purpose entered
into continued communications with the Commandant General of
the States, and so learned, that said General thinks that, agreeably
to the commission conferred upon him by the Supreme Government
of the Union, under the third article of the national law of
6th April, 1830, the commission of said arrested commissioner was
in opposition to the 11th article of said general law; and notwithstanding
he has been assured that such is not the case, he still
persists in his opinion. For these reasons, this matter is in such a
situation, that, to remove the obstacles, it would be necessary to
adopt measures that might compromit the State to the highest
degree."

Newell, Chester. History of the revolution in Texas, particularly of the war of 1835 & '36; together with the latest geographical, topographical, and statistical accounts of the country, from the most authentic sources. Also, an appendix. By the Rev. C. Newell.. New York. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth6109/. Accessed December 18, 2014.