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 Collection: A. F. Weaver Collection
[A Parade in 1925]
A military contingent of the 1925 West Texas Chamber of Commerce Parade in Mineral Wells is shown here. The parade is proceeding west in the 100 block of NE 2nd Street. Please note the Mineral Wells Sanatorium in the upper right of the photograph just east of the old Post Office. Please note also the double line of angle-parked automobiles on the street. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16298/
[North Oak Avenue Street Scene]
A street scene of North Oak Avenue, looking north from Hubbard Street, taken about 1930, includes businesses as: Palace Drug Company, Owl Book Store, American Cafe, Poston Dry Goods, Max Miller's Shoe Store, Caldwell Hotel, Texas Power and Light, Bath House and Crazy Water Hotel. Please note that the street has been paved, and a traffic light is present. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16296/
[People in a Parade]
A buggy is shown here, filled with people dressed in what appears to be fashions from the 1920's. The buggy wheels are decorated for a parade and the buggy itself has the name "T. J. Green" on it. The location appears to be in front of the Gibson Well in the 700 block of NW 2nd Avenue, now [2008] the location of the First Christian Church. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16295/
Time Was in Mineral Wells
The dust cover of "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells... 1975 Edition," considered the first pictorial history of the city, is illustrated here. The book is the product of A.F. Weaver, whose collection of photographs comprises the "A. F. Weaver Collection." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16294/
Lower End of Mesquite St.
A view of Mesquite Street (in 2008: NE 1st Avenue), taken in 1910, and looking south-east. The scene shows horse-drawn wagons loaded with cotton bales. Electrical lines are visible. The building at the northeast corner of East Hubbard Street and South Mesquite Street is the D.M. Howard Block. D. M Howard was the first of five Howard brothers to come to Mineral Wells and establish businesses. There was a Dry Goods store on the left end of the building, a millinery shop above it, and a grocery store was in the building to the right. Later the J.M. Belcher Furniture occupied the building; and still later, R&W Furniture. Demolition of the building began March 17 of 1975 to make room for the Savings and Loan Building and a parking lot. The First State Bank now [2007] occupies this entire block. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16293/
One of the Residence Streets
Pictured here is a promotional brochure. The main part of the picture is a view looking west on Moore Street (now NE 6th Street). At the left (south) side of the street, in the middle distance, is the Hexagon House Hotel that was built by David G. Galbraith, inventor of the paper clip. The hotel opened in 1897. To the immediate left is the Gibson Well and Drinking Pavilion. At the far corner of the Gibson property, in the middle of the street, appears to be the public drinking fountain shown in a companion picture--AWO_1076P--which is also included in the Weaver Collection. The fountain was apparently removed from the intersection when the "Dinky cars" began operating to Lake Pinto in 1905. The poor quality of the image is due to print screening. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16292/
Memorial Day Parade 1955
This picture shows a float, sponsored by the State National Bank, that depicts the raising the American flag on the island of Iwo Jima during WWII. The float is passing in front of the Oak Avenue Cafe at the corner of NE 2nd Street and Oak Avenue, Mineral Wells, Texas. The G and A Feed store, pictured in the background, faces NE 2nd Street. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16291/
In The Good Old Days
This picture is accompanied by a newspaper article that chronicles the activities of a group of men repairing the public highway between Mineral Wells and Palo Pinto in the year 1920--before the Texas Highway Department was created. Pictured are the following people: Harold Guinn on left with spade. J. L. Miller on truck fender. Standing, left to right: Red Taylor, George Oliver, Johnnie Liveley; Irl Preston and W. T. Tygrett shaking hands, with Joe Dillon standing between them. Also standing in the background are Clarence Wewerkka, W. C. Caldwell, W. I. Smith, and Lawrence Davis. The photograph is listed as courtesy of W. T. Tygrett. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16289/
[Paving East Hubbard Street in Mineral Wells]
A group of men work on paving East Hubbard street in Mineral Wells. Electrical lines are present. Street paving in Mineral Wells began in 1914. On the right is the Richards House. Behind the house is Lamar Flats water pavilion, now [2008]the site of the Baker Hotel. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16288/
[Mesquite Street, Looking South]
Shown here is a view of Mesquite Street (Now [2008] NE First Avenue) from its upper end at Coke Street (now NE 2nd Street). Horse-drawn vehicles are present. The building at the left middle of the picture with the "DRUGS" sign and the stone lion statue on its roof is the Yeager Building, home of what was popularly called "The Lion Drug Store." The first building on right, 205 NE First Street (with arched windows) was H. M. Coleman's clothing store for men, which even at this early date, appears to be undergoing renovation. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16287/
[A View of Mesquite Street, Mineral Wells]
An early scene of Mesquite Street (now [2008] NE 1st Avenue) looking North toward old U.S. Post Office from the corner of East Hubbard Street. Electrical lines are present as are cars and trucks typical of the post-1914 era, when the streets of Mineral Wells were paved. The cornerstone for the Post Office was laid in May, 1912. The building on the near right housed Campbell's Bargain store. It occupied the site of the current Baker Hotel (Opened in 1929.) texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16286/
[The Budweiser Clydesdale Team]
A scene in the 400 block of North Oak, looking towards the south on Oak Avenue, taken in the 1930's. (Shadows indicate the picture was taken in the early morning.) The Budweiser Clydesdale team was introduced to the public in 1933, and is shown along the 200 block west. The "CRAZY" sign that spanned Hubbard Ave. (now US Highway 180) a block behind the Clydesdale team was erected in 1933 also, probably later in the same year the picture was taken. A two-story garage/office building, the former Seaman's Pontiac Agency (still standing in 2010) is visible alongside the Anheuser-Busch beer wagon. Other businesses noted are: Dr. M. S. Green, Chiropractor; King's Cafe. The prominent building behind the Clydesdale team is still standing at the corner of Hubbard Street and Oak Avenue. Advertising signs noted: Texaco, Mobilgas, and a sign on the seaman's building for Crazy Water Crystals. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16285/
Moore St [Now NE. 6th St.]
A view of Moore Street (now [2008] NE 6th Street) is shown here, looking east up Welcome Mountain, with the Hexagon Hotel on the left side of the street near the middle of the picture. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16284/
NW 6th Street-1906
A legend on the photograph announces: "NW 6th Street: 1906." It shows two children on donkeys and a horse and wagon. The view is west from Welcome Mountain (now East Mountain.) It appears that the old McCutcheon home (now [2008] the Gil Hull home) can be seen on the right at 612 NW 6th Street. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16283/
Oak Street , Looking South
We have here a picture of Oak Street, looking South. The Poston Company and the Palace Saloon are easily visible in photograph. The wording "Fishburn Dallas" appears on the photograph. The unpaved street, several horses and wagons in picture date the picture to an era before 1914, when the street was paved. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16282/
Petroleum Products, The Texas Company
This is a picture of truck number D-677, bearing the identification of Texaco Petroleum Products, The Texas Company. A woman sits in the cab of the truck. The truck itself seems to date to about 1912. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16281/
[Two Men and a Woman]
This picture shows two unidentified men and a woman. The photograph is believed to have been taken during construction of the road up Wynn Mountain east of Palo Pinto (prior to construction of the Bankhead Highway, which was built following passage of "Good Roads Act" in 1916.) texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16280/
Looking south on Mesquite Street
A street scene, identified as Mesquite Street (now NE 1st Avenue)and looking south, taken at the turn of the twentieth century, shows businesses that antedate the coming of the automobile. On the right, in the middle of the picture, the Yeager Building is shown with a stone lion mounted on its roof. Many historians now refer to this building as the Lion Drug Store. However, current Yeager descendants now living in Mineral Wells do not remember the store as ever being named anything but The Yeager Drug Store. The third building on the left (with the spire on top) was the Star Well whose manager, Frank Richards was an active participant in Mineral Wells' early business and social activities. At the end of the street is Mineral Wells depot built in 1902. Absence of the "Dinky Car" tracks in the middle of the street indicates that the picture was taken prior to the building of the Mineral Wells Lakewood Park Scenic Railway in 1905. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16279/
Site of the New Frost Building
Construction of Frost Building in Mineral Wells, Texas. A legend on the bottom reads: "Photograph by McClure." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16278/
[The Delaware Hotel on fire]
The destruction of the Delaware Hotel in Mineral Wells, Texas is illustrated here. The hotel was located at the corner of N. Oak Avenue and NE 3rd St. The fire was fought by horse-drawn fire wagons and a pumper. Trolley rails visible in middle of unpaved street date the picture as being between 1907, when the street car began operations, and 1914 when the street was paved. A partly obliterated legend on the photograph declares that it was taken by "Ellis." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16277/
[A Vacant lot in downtown Mineral Wells]
A vacant lot in downtown Mineral Wells, Texas, next to the Central Christian Church, located on NW 1st Street is shown here. Advertisements of products, and coming movie attractions, are displayed on a large bill board, and on an adjoining house. The lot is messy, and a note indicates that it is to be part of a beautification project. The clean-up referred to in the accompanying note was probably more than a general "Spring Cleaning" campaign for the city of Mineral Wells. It was probably part of the "Wylie Park" beautification project. Smoke rising from stove pipes belonging to nearby businesses indicate cool weather. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16274/
[Ladies with parasols]
"Sllew La Renim" (a social club) was "Mineral Wells" spelled backwards. Its members pose in front of the Old Post Office in 1913. Identified in the photograph are: Anna Mae Guinn, Ernestine Pollard, May Belle Smith, Ann Locke Galbraith, Ruby Andrews, Mattie Withers. Note the Mineral Wells Sanitarium in the left background. This photograph may be found on page 118 of "TIME WAS...", First Edition by A.F. Weaver. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16273/
The Oxford Hotel
The Hubbard Street Trolley car is shown at Oak and Hubbard Streets on its way west to Pinto Lake, next to the Oxford Hotel. The First State Bank and Trust was located in the northwest (near) corner of the hotel. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16272/
Oak Street, Looking North
An early view of Oak Street (now Oak Avenue), looking North is shown here. The first intersecting road is Hubbard Street. Part of the Oxford Hotel is visible on the southeast corner of Hubbard and Oak. Please note the utter lack of street lights. Street car tracks and an overhead cable run on Oak. Mineral Wells Electric System (Street Car) ceased operation in 1913. The downtown streets were paved in 1914. A hardware store, possibly Davidson's, is on the southwest corner of Hubbard and Oak. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16271/
[A Portrait Presentation at KORC]
Mrs. Jess (Ruby) Shattles presents a photographic picture of Achilles Corcanges, founder and owner of radio station KORC in Mineral Wells to the same Mr. Corcanges. Mrs. Shattles owned and operated Pavilion Studio at 412 N. Oak Avenue. The picture was taken about 1946, when station KORC opened. The unidentified gentleman, with his back to the photographer,on the left is believed to be Mr. Shattles. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16270/
[The Mineral Wells Golf Country Club and Lake]
Please note the men in golf attire standing on bank, one of whom is holding a bag of golf clubs. Knee-length knickers with decorated socks were typical golf wear in the Roaring Twenties. Others are lounging around on the bank between club house and lake on a typical lazy Sunday afternoon. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16269/
KORC 1140 On Your Dial
A picture of a KORC-KBS Microphone--"1140 on your dial" is shown here. Mineral Wells' radio history dates back to the 1930's when Mr. Hal Collins, owner of the Crazy Hotel, began sponsoring broadcasts originating in the hotel lobby. The radio station was founded and owned by Mr. Achilles Corcanges, and aired its first broadcast on December 5, 1946. Radio station KMWT-FM began broadcasting from Mineral Wells in 1970. The broadcasts were aired nationwide, at noon daily, over the Texas Quality Network. It advertised Crazy Water Crystals. Both stations' call letters were changed in 1983 to KJAS-AM and KYXS-FM. Many show business luminaries appeared on the shows. For instance, Mary Martin of Weatherford began her singing/acting career here. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16268/
[A Tamale Vendor on Oak and Hubbard]
Fred Estrada "The Mineral Wells Hot Tamale Man," sold "The Best Tamales Anywhere", at 75 cents a dozen, at the corner of Hubbard Street and Oak Avenue for many years. Automobiles, dating from the early-to-mid-twentieth century, and a U.S. Mailbox, may also be seen in the picture. The picture occurs on page 182 of "TIME WAS...", second edition. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16267/
[A Trolley Car of the] Mineral Wells Electric System
This picture shows the Mineral Wells Electric System Trolley Car Number 23. The Mineral Wells Electric System operated from 1902 (?) to 1913. The picture appears to have been taken in the 1400 block of W. Hubbard Street, where the street car unloaded passengers for a short hike north to Lake Pinto. The street car reversed here, and traveled across town to Elmwood Cemetery--around NE 17th Avenue. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16266/
[The Lynch Cabins]
A drawing of the Lynch cabins, done by Jarmon Alvis Lynch, grandson of James Alvis Lynch. The drawing says "Alvis Lynch 77" in the bottom right-hand corner. The picture was apparently done from memory. The original mineral water discovery well is in the right foreground, with a windlass for drawing water. "Judge" Lynch and his family did not arrive in Millsap Valley until Christmas 1879. Note the tents in the right background. H. M. Berry, Mineral Wells' first teacher, noted in an article that when the reputation for the curative powers of the water spread, the area looked like "an army on the move" with health-seekers temporarily camping in tents until housing could be built for them. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16265/
The American Legion Drum and Bugle Corp at their 1933 Convention in Chicago
This much-decayed picture has obviously been pinned to a cork-board. Enough of the legend at its bottom survives to proclaim that the picture commemorates the attendance of the Drum and Bugle Corps of Mineral Wells' Fearis Anderson Post No. 75, at a national convention of the the American Legion, in Chicago, Illinois, on October 2-5, 1933. The photograph was taken, the legend states, compliments of the Majestic Hotel. Please note: The American Legion provided the following names to accompany the picture: David Burnswick,[sic] Director; Paul Grable, Drum Major; Tommie Burns, Trumpet; James W. Calvert, Trumpet; E.M. Davidson, Trumpet; Lawrence Davis, Trumpet; Sam Goldman, Trumpet; Jack Armstrong, Trumpet; Bob Echols,[sic] Clarinet; (?) Davidson, Clarinet; Lloyd Kendall, Clarinet; Bob Irvine, Clarinet; (?)Brady, Piccolo; Arly (?) Bolfour,[sic] S. Drums, B. Drums; Dan Raeffell,[sic] Bass; W.E. Davis, Bass; Roy Prince, Trombone; Vaughan Davis, Trombone; (?) Trombone; Franz Schubert, Baritone; Alex Pavlovsky, Horn; W. W. Woodward. Horn; George Oliver, Horn; Bill Chancellor, Color Bearer; W.H.H. Smith, Color Bearer; Allan Wallace, Color Guard; George Barber, Color Guard. This band was awarded a state championship three times. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16264/
[A Parade of Automobiles]
A parade of decorated automobiles is shown crossing the intersection at North Oak and NE 2nd Streets,as seen from the west. A sign for Lovera Cigars is visible on the front of the Crazy Drug Company (the gray building at right middle of the picture.) The large white building in the left center back-ground is the Presbyterian Church. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16263/
[Sam Whatley Presenting Check to Slogan Contest Winner]
Sam Whatley (dressed in a Cadillac uniform), the Service Manager for the Young Motor Company (a local Cadillac dealership), presents a check to Mr. and Mrs. Evans Holland, winners of a slogan contest. The winning slogan was "Cadillac every time for better motor service." The microphone above them is labeled as belonging to station KORC, which opened December 5, 1946. It changed its name to KJSA in 1983, when the station was sold to Jerry Snyder. A colophon on the lower right identifies "SW Photo" as the photographer. (The picture occurs on page 185 of TIME WAS, second edition.) texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16262/
[Two men dressed as Bonnie and Clyde]
Two men, posing as the notorious gangsters of the 'thirties (Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow), standing beside a (1932 Ford?), are shown in front of Woods Camera Shop. Woods Camera Shop advertises (on a faded sign in front of the store) "Eastman Dealer - Enlarging Framing Finishing - Kodaks Loaned Free" The occasion of this disguise remains, as yet, unknown. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16261/
[People Marching in a Parade]
Shown here is a photograph of people walking south along North Oak Avenue in a street parade, with some individuals playing musical instruments. The prominent building in the middle right of the picture is the former Crazy Theater on the east side of Oak Avenue, across the street from the Crazy Hotel. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16260/
[A Baseball Team]
This picture shows a men's baseball team in Mineral Wells, but the identification of both the team and the men are unknown. Ike Zablosky (sometimes spelled Zabronski), a Russian immigrant, arrived in America in 1906. He entered the fur-trading business in Mineral Wells, and is credited with naming the Possum Kingdom area when a customer inquired about some premium pelts. Zablosky replied that he had none at the time, but "When my boys return from the possum kingdom, I'm sure they will have some." Zablosky operated a class C professional league baseball team (the Resorters)in Mineral Wells. He became owner of the first professional baseball team in Dallas, later in life. The Chicago White Sox are known to have held their Spring Training camp in Mineral Wells in 1911, and again during a three-year stretch of 1916, 1917, and 1918. It has not been established whether the players shown in this picture represent the Resorters or White Sox teams. The man in the background, apparently in uniform, is shown holding an instrument (probably a bugle) whose function has not been determined. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16258/
[A Parade in Mineral Wells on North Oak Avenue]
The Chamber of Commerce float, with the Parade Princess, greets visitors in the 1936 Centennial Parade in Mineral Wells,Texas. It is shown proceeding along the 200 block of North Oak Avenue. Businesses in photograph include, (bunting-festooned) Perry Brothers 5-10-and 25-cent store, City Bakery, and (to the left) part of Duke & Ayers 5-& 10-cent store. Angle-parked automobiles and spectators line the street. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16257/
[A Man with a Catfish]
An unknown man is pictured holding a catfish that he has presumably caught. An embossed legend at the base of the picture states that the photograph was taken by Young's Photography, Mineral Wells, Texas. (Palo Pinto County held the Texas record in 2005 for a catfish. A ninety-six-pound monster was caught at the outflow of Morris Sheppard Dam on Possum Kingdom Lake.) texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16256/
[Inspiration Point]
The label on the photograph reads both "Possum Kingdom Dam" and "Inspiration Point". A. F. and Patsy Weaver are shown enjoying the view from Inspiration Point. A.F. Weaver himself took the photograph, using a tripod and camera timer,in the same vicinity where he had proposed to Patsy Weaver years before this photograph was taken. In the early part of the twentieth century,the internationally known evangelist, Billy Sunday, visited Mineral Wells. He was told about an outstanding view from a vantage point south of town. On seeing the vista for himself,the Rev. Sunday remarked it was truly an inspirational view. Since that time the viewpoint has been known as "Inspiration Point". This vista is seven miles south of Mineral Wells off US Highway 281, and approximately 40 miles below the Morris Sheppard Dam at Possum Kingdom Lake. It has been called one of the most beautiful scenic views in Texas. This picture has possibly been used in the course of the advertising of interesting things to see and do around Mineral Wells, which might explain the label attached to the photograph. Similarly captivating is a view from "Observation Point" the Dam at Possum Kingdom Lake. The two vistas, some 20 to 30 miles apart,overlook entirely different stretches of the Brazos, each with its own unique but spectacular view. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16255/
Lovers Retreat
A small group of people sitting on a large rock on the north bank of Eagle Creek are reflected in the water of the swimming hole at Lover's Retreat. The former public recreation park (located four miles west of Palo Pinto north of United States Highway US 180) has been described as one of the most scenic places in Texas. It was for years a favorite recreation spot in Palo Pinto County, with a wide picnic area south of the creek and a field of huge boulders on the north accessible by a swinging suspension-cable foot- bridge. Various legends are cited for the park's colorful name, including haven for a man named Lover during his flight from enemy pursuit; refuge during the tragic flight of an Indian Princess and her Indian suitor from vengeful, feuding inter-tribal pursuers; and (most likely) a tryst for local swains and their inamoratas. (The photograph is poorly reproduced in its printed source.) texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16254/
[Four Golfers at Mineral Wells Country Club - 1930's]
Four unidentified men in golfing knickers (apparently from the early 1930's, to judge by their dress) stand in front of, and across the lake from the original Holiday Hills Country Club house. They are putting on what is now the Number 12 green. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16253/
The New Suspension Bridge at Lover's Retreat, Near Mineral Wells, Texas
A suspension bridge for pedestrian traffic across Eagle Creek at Lover's Retreat is shown here, from what must be a picture post-card. Formerly a public park, and now on private property, it was located four miles west of Palo Pinto on the old Bankhead Highway (now U.S. Highway 180). texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16251/
[An Aerial View of Mineral Wells (1 of 2)]
A view from West Mountain looking ESE, contains the following landmarks: The Hexagon Hotel (1895-1959) in the upper middle of the picture, and the Chautauqua (1905-1912) in the upper right. One block right (south) and one block this side (west) of the Chautauqua is Crazy Flats Drinking Pavilion (burned in 1925). The Sangura- Sprudel Well and Drinking Pavilion is below and left (one block north and one block west) of The Hexagon. The Fairfield Inn is one block plus north and east (left) of the Hexagon and about half way up East Mountain. The Vichy Well (Later known as The Beach and still later as the Standard Well) is on the right, and across the street from the Hexagon. It was later the location of the USO building in World War II, and is now [2006] the North Oak Community Center. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16250/
[An Aerial View of Mineral Wells (2 of 2)]
This aerial photograph is adjacent to, and south of, the previous photograph. It is taken from South Mountain, looking east-south-east. The Chautauqua is on the upper left of the picture. The Crazy Flats Drinking Pavilion (which burned March 15, 1925) is below and to the right of the Chautauqua. The area in foreground is a residential area of west Mineral Wells, Texas. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16249/
[The Sunshine Special]
A locomotive engine pulls the Texas & Pacific "Red Eye" passenger train, named The Sunshine Special. These business-friendly trains were scheduled to arrive in the Dallas/Ft Worth area at about 9 AM from both the east and the west. This picture was taken by A.F. Weaver at Millsap, Texas in 1940. It was published in the Rotogravure section of the Fort Worth Star-Telegram. The Series 700- (714-) series engine shown was replaced a few years later by larger, more powerful Series 600 engines capable of greater speed. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16248/
[The Gulf and Brazos Valley Railroad Depot]
A caption to the photograph states: "Gulf and Brazos Valley Railroad Depot 1899-1902. Erected back some 80 years ago, and served the Brazos Valley Railroad from Mineral Wells to Peck City near Millsap, now known as Bennett." The area formerly known as Peck City is now the location of an Acme brick plant, and is named "Bennett" for the rail switch that serves the plant. Standing on the right in the photograph is Noble Nuttall, father of Verne Nuttall, the first depot operator and telegraph operator. Please note the guitar near the woman at the window. The depot was once located on the site now occupied by the Hayes Lumber Company, in the 300 block on SE 1st Avenue. The newspaper caption: "Passengers would ride on the Texas and Pacific to Peck City and come by the Brazos Valley train from Peck City to Mineral Wells" is incorrect. The GULF and BRAZOS RIVER RAILWAY was strictly a freight line that hauled coal from the Rock Creek mines (east of Mineral Wells) to the T&P main line at Peck City. The first depot in Mineral Wells for passenger service from Weatherford was built when the W.-M.W.-N.W. that first arrived in Mineral Wells in 1891. It burned down, and it was replaced by the current brick depot in 1902, the year the GBV was sold at a sheriff's auction in Weatherford. (Photo courtesy of Verne Nuttall) texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16246/
[A Panorama Taken in 1974 (first)]
Shown here is a panoramic View of Mineral Wells, Texas taken August 8, 1974. The Baker Hotel and the Crazy Water Hotel are visible. The Convention Center is seen in the far left of the photograph. The view is from West Mountain, looking toward East Mountain over north Mineral Wells. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16245/
[A Panorama Taken in 1974 (second)]
This picture shows a panoramic view of northwest Mineral Wells from West Mountain, looking toward East Mountain. Included in photograph are the Convention Center, the Box Factory, and the Crazy Water Hotel. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16244/
[A Panorama Taken in 1974 (third)]
illustrated here is a panorama of Mineral Wells, looking east from West Mountain. The Baker Hotel and First National Bank (now Bank of America) are visible in center of photograph. Native plants are pictured in the left of photograph. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16243/
[Panorama 1974 (fourth)]
A view of Mineral Wells,is shown, looking southwest from East Mountain over the First National Bank (now Bank of America). texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16242/