You limited your search to:

  Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
 Collection: A. F. Weaver Collection
[A Panorama Taken in 1974 (third)]

[A Panorama Taken in 1974 (third)]

Date: August 10, 1974
Creator: unknown
Description: illustrated here is a panorama of Mineral Wells, looking east from West Mountain. The Baker Hotel and First National Bank (now Bank of America) are visible in center of photograph. Native plants are pictured in the left of photograph.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[A Panorama  Taken in 1974 (second)]

[A Panorama Taken in 1974 (second)]

Date: August 10, 1974
Creator: unknown
Description: This picture shows a panoramic view of northwest Mineral Wells from West Mountain, looking toward East Mountain. Included in photograph are the Convention Center, the Box Factory, and the Crazy Water Hotel.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[A Panorama Taken in 1974 (first)]

[A Panorama Taken in 1974 (first)]

Date: August 10, 1974
Creator: unknown
Description: Shown here is a panoramic View of Mineral Wells, Texas taken August 8, 1974. The Baker Hotel and the Crazy Water Hotel are visible. The Convention Center is seen in the far left of the photograph. The view is from West Mountain, looking toward East Mountain over north Mineral Wells.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Gulf and Brazos Valley Railroad Depot]

[The Gulf and Brazos Valley Railroad Depot]

Date: 1900?
Creator: unknown
Description: A caption to the photograph states: "Gulf and Brazos Valley Railroad Depot 1899-1902. Erected back some 80 years ago, and served the Brazos Valley Railroad from Mineral Wells to Peck City near Millsap, now known as Bennett." The area formerly known as Peck City is now the location of an Acme brick plant, and is named "Bennett" for the rail switch that serves the plant. Standing on the right in the photograph is Noble Nuttall, father of Verne Nuttall, the first depot operator and telegraph operator. Please note the guitar near the woman at the window. The depot was once located on the site now occupied by the Hayes Lumber Company, in the 300 block on SE 1st Avenue. The newspaper caption: "Passengers would ride on the Texas and Pacific to Peck City and come by the Brazos Valley train from Peck City to Mineral Wells" is incorrect. The GULF and BRAZOS RIVER RAILWAY was strictly a freight line that hauled coal from the Rock Creek mines (east of Mineral Wells) to the T&P main line at Peck City. The first depot in Mineral Wells for passenger service from Weatherford was built when the W.-M.W.-N.W. that first arrived in Mineral ...
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Sunshine Special]

[The Sunshine Special]

Date: 1940
Creator: Weaver, A.F.
Description: A locomotive engine pulls the Texas & Pacific "Red Eye" passenger train, named The Sunshine Special. These business-friendly trains were scheduled to arrive in the Dallas/Ft Worth area at about 9 AM from both the east and the west. This picture was taken by A.F. Weaver at Millsap, Texas in 1940. It was published in the Rotogravure section of the Fort Worth Star-Telegram. The 700- (714-) series engine shown was replaced a few years later by larger, more powerful Series 600 engines capable of greater speed.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[An Aerial View of Mineral Wells (2 of 2)]

[An Aerial View of Mineral Wells (2 of 2)]

Date: 1910?
Creator: A. F. Weaver
Description: This aerial photograph is adjacent to, and south of, the previous photograph. It is taken from South Mountain, looking east-south-east. The Chautauqua is on the upper left of the picture. The Crazy Flats Drinking Pavilion (which burned March 15, 1925) is below and to the right of the Chautauqua. The area in foreground is a residential area of west Mineral Wells, Texas.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[An Aerial View of Mineral Wells (1 of 2)]

[An Aerial View of Mineral Wells (1 of 2)]

Date: 1905?/1912?
Creator: A. F. Weaver
Description: A view from West Mountain looking ESE, contains the following landmarks: The Hexagon Hotel (1895-1959) in the upper middle of the picture, and the Chautauqua (1905-1912) in the upper right. One block right (south) and one block this side (west) of the Chautauqua is Crazy Flats Drinking Pavilion (burned in 1925). The Sangura- Sprudel Well and Drinking Pavilion is below and left (one block north and one block west) of The Hexagon. The Fairfield Inn is one block plus north and east (left) of the Hexagon and about half way up East Mountain. The Vichy Well (Later known as The Beach and still later as the Standard Well) is on the right, and across the street from the Hexagon. It was later the location of the USO building in World War II, and is now [2006] the North Oak Community Center.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
The New Suspension Bridge at Lover's Retreat, Near Mineral Wells, Texas

The New Suspension Bridge at Lover's Retreat, Near Mineral Wells, Texas

Date: 1920?
Creator: unknown
Description: A suspension bridge for pedestrian traffic across Eagle Creek at Lover's Retreat is shown here, from what must be a picture post-card. Formerly a public park, and now on private property, it was located four miles west of Palo Pinto on the old Bankhead Highway (now U.S. Highway 180).
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[Four golfers at Mineral Wells Country Club - 1930's]

[Four golfers at Mineral Wells Country Club - 1930's]

Date: 1930?
Creator: unknown
Description: Four unidentified men in golfing knickers (apparently from the early 1930's) stand in front of, and across the lake from the original Holiday Hills Country Club house. They are putting on what is now the Number 12 green.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
Lovers Retreat

Lovers Retreat

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: A small group of people sitting on a large rock on the north bank of Eagle Creek are reflected in the water of the swimming hole at Lover's Retreat. The former public recreation park (located four miles west of Palo Pinto north of United States Highway US 180) has been described as one of the most scenic places in Texas. It was for years a favorite recreation spot in Palo Pinto County, with a wide picnic area south of the creek and a field of huge boulders on the north accessible by a swinging suspension-cable foot- bridge. Various legends are cited for the park's colorful name, including haven for a man named Lover during his flight from enemy pursuit; refuge during the tragic flight of an Indian Princess and her Indian suitor from vengeful, feuding inter-tribal pursuers; and (most likely) a tryst for local swains and their inamoratas. (The photograph is poorly reproduced in its printed source.)
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library