You limited your search to:

  Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
 Decade: 1930-1939
 Collection: A. F. Weaver Collection
[Crystal Plant]

[Crystal Plant]

Date: 1930
Creator: unknown
Description: A picture of the Crystal Production Line is shown here. On the back of the photograph is typed: CRYSTALS WERE THEN PACKED INTO GREEN AND WHITE BOXES AND RUN DOWN THE CONVEYOR WHERE GIRLS PLACED THE LIDS. AT THE END OF THE BELT A MACHINE WRAPPED THE BOX IN CELLOPHANE. PHOTO 1930
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
Crazy Park Entrance

Crazy Park Entrance

Date: 1938
Creator: unknown
Description: Shown here is the entrance to Crazy Park, Mineral Wells, Texas, a picture taken in 1938. This park was earlier a part of the Gibson Pavilion and Park in the 700 block of NW 2nd Avenue. It was located a block south of the Crazy Water Crystals plant, built in 1919. The property now [2008] belongs to, and is occupied by, the First Christian Church.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[Crazy Water Company Railroad Cars]

[Crazy Water Company Railroad Cars]

Date: 1930
Creator: unknown
Description: Men are shown here loading boxes of Crazy Crystals onto railroad boxcars. Crazy Water Crystals were shipped nationwide in response to demand created by radio advertising. This scene is typical of the activity required to load boxcars to meet the demand for "instant Mineral Water." Printed on back of the photograph is: "Loading Crazy Crystals 1930."
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
Sewerage Disposal Plant

Sewerage Disposal Plant

Date: 1930?/1939?
Creator: unknown
Description: Mineral Wells' Sewerage Disposal Plant was built on the site of the former Elmhurst Park on Pollard Creek, approximately 2 miles SSW of the city. The city obtained the park property, and built the sewerage treatment plant during the recovery from the Great Depression of the 1930's. Shown here is a photograph of a clipping from a newspaper.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
View of Mineral Wells from East Mountain Showing Crazy Hotel & Nazareth Hospital

View of Mineral Wells from East Mountain Showing Crazy Hotel & Nazareth Hospital

Date: 1930?/1939?
Creator: unknown
Description: A view of Mineral Wells from East Mountain, looking West-Northwest is shown here. The Crazy Hotel is visible in the near-left part of the picture, and the Nazareth Hospital in the middle-left, a block Northwest of the Crazy The Norwood Clinic (with its stately white columns), a block northeast of the Nazareth, is located near the center of the picture.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
Sewing Room

Sewing Room

Date: 1937?
Creator: unknown
Description: The back of the photograph exhibits a note that this picture was copied from the "Burro", which is the Mineral Wells High School yearbook. The "Sewing Room" was a classroom in the Lillian Peek Home Economics building on the grounds of the high school. The Lillian Peek cottage was built by the WPA in 1937, and was the first free- standing house built specifically for Home Economics education in the State of Texas. It was "Current state of the art" when it was completed. The building now houses the Creative Arts Center, and is used by the local Art Club as an art workshop and museum.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
Methodist Church - Baker Gardens - East Mountain

Methodist Church - Baker Gardens - East Mountain

Date: 1930?
Creator: unknown
Description: This photograph appears to be taken from a picture post-card, which includes the old Methodist Church, the Baker Hotel Garden, the Baker Water Storage Building, and the Welcome Sign on East Mountain. It is a rare view. The home of Druggist Dr. C. F. Yeager on NE 2nd Street in the picture was still standing at the time of this picture. During construction of his Hotel, Mr. Baker visited Hot Springs, Arkansas; and he was so impressed with the Arlington Hotel that he stopped building construction, and moved the hotel a block further west. He converted the basement, already built, into a swimming pool (only the second hotel known to have a pool at the time), and an underground laundry. The Methodist church has since been rebuilt, the water storage building has been removed, and the "Welcome" sign has been relocated further east to greet visitors from its new location overlooking Elmwood Cemetery.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
Famous Mineral Water

Famous Mineral Water

Date: 1930?
Creator: unknown
Description: The Famous Water Company, founded by Ed Dismuke (still located at 215 NW 6th Street) has been restored, and still [2007] sells mineral water. The large concrete bottle depicts the original shape of the container of the product sold. Dismuke also established a plant on the east bank of Lake Pinto, west of Mineral Wells, to manufacture his "PRONTO-LAX" Crystals. He organized the Mineral Wells Lakewood Scenic Railway in partnership with local banker Cicero Smith, whose gasoline-powered "Dinky Cars" operated quarter-hourly between Lake Pinto and Mineral Wells from 1905 to 1909. The Famous Water Company currently sells three grades of water: Regular, full-strength mineral water; deep (400 ft.) well water; and deep-well water that has been ionized and filtered by reverse osmosis.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[Crazy Crystals]

[Crazy Crystals]

Date: 1930/1939
Creator: unknown
Description: Men and women are shown here packaging Crazy Water Crystals. Mineral water was evaporated, and the resulting crystal deposits were gathered and packaged in various sizes for shipment throughout the United States. Written on back of this photograph is: "Pkg Crazy Crystals 1930's" and the name "Buster."
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[Crazy Sign, 1 of 2]

[Crazy Sign, 1 of 2]

Date: 1936?
Creator: unknown
Description: This picture, looking east with the Baker Hotel in the background, of the Crazy Hotel sign was colorized by Mr. A.F. Weaver. The Crazy Sign was constructed in 1933 in the center of Mineral Wells and spanned Hubbard Street (US 180) at its intersection with Oak Avenue It was quite a landmark, as it was one of only two signs allowed by the Texas Department of Transportation to cross a highway maintained by the State. The sign was torn down on December 24, 1958. The urgency of its removal during the Holiday Season was never explained; nor was it ever quite understood by the general public. It was sold for scrap some time later.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
FIRST PREV 1 2 3 4 NEXT LAST