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  Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
 Collection: A. F. Weaver Collection
[The Thurber Smokestack and Related Buildings]

[The Thurber Smokestack and Related Buildings]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: Thurber, Texas: A dirt road meets another road in distance; a smoke stack stands in distance; a red fire-house with white roof shows to left. A building, in the far left, now [2008] houses the eponymous Smokestack Cafe. An historic plaque can be seen at the base of the smokestack, but it cannot be read from this photograph.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The First Motorcycle in Mineral Wells]

[The First Motorcycle in Mineral Wells]

Date: 1908
Creator: unknown
Description: A caption, taken from "Time Was..." by A. F. Weaver, on page 116 states: "Pictured in 1908 is Frank Richards, owner of the first motorcycle bought in Mineral Wells. D. C. Harris owned the second motorcycle." Frank Richards was the manager of the Star Well during Mineral Wells' heyday as a popular health spa resort, and the boy on the motorbike with him has been identified as his son, Robert Frank Richards. D. C. Harris was the postmaster, and served as Mayor of the city at one time.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[A Marina on Possum Kingdom Lake]

[A Marina on Possum Kingdom Lake]

Date: August 11, 1974
Creator: unknown
Description: Shown here is a view of Possum Kingdom Lake, at possibly Harmar Harbor, showing one of its many marinas.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Carlsbad Well Building]

[The Carlsbad Well Building]

Date: 1909?
Creator: unknown
Description: The caption of this 1909 photograph that occurs on page 63 of "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells" by A. F. Weaver, notes "...the stained glass windows had not been installed as yet and the "Ben Hur" street car tracks were still running in front of the building." (The Mineral Wells Scenic Railway--the Ben Hur Line to Lake Pinto--ceased operation in 1909, but rails were removed later, probably in conjunction with paving City Streets in 1914.) One of the earlier drinking pavilions, The Carlsbad was located at 415 NW 1st Avenue, directly across the street and west of the Crazy Water drinking pavilion. The Crazy Flats Rooming house--which replaced the Crazy Drinking Pavilion--along with the First Crazy Hotel complex--burned in 1925, and were replaced by the current Crazy Hotel, covering the entire block. The hotel opened in 1927. The Carlsbad building was taken over by the Crazy Hotel in the 1930's, and it was used as a laundry.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Knights of Pythias Band]

[The Knights of Pythias Band]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: This photograph appears on page 187 of "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells..." (Second edition, 1988, by A. F. Weaver) with the caption, "Knight of Pythias 212 Band of Mineral Wells". The photograph is labeled "K of P Band -- Guy Woodward, Director, Mineral Wells, Texas." The Knights of Pythias Lodge is now located at 610 SE 14th Street in Mineral Wells, adjacent to the former Kidwell Heights elementary school. The Knights of Pythias has run an orphans' home in Weatherford, Texas since the turn of the twentieth century. Mr. Weaver had been in possession of a Pythian album, from which this picture may have been abstracted.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[A Panoramic View of Lake Mineral Wells]

[A Panoramic View of Lake Mineral Wells]

Date: 1930?
Creator: unknown
Description: An early panoramic view of Lake Mineral Wells is illustrated here. The lake was built by the city of Mineral Wells for a municipal water supply in 1920. Rock Creek, in Parker County, was dammed to impound a lake approximately one mile wide and five miles long. An island, visible in the center of this picture, was initially accessible only by boat; but a wooden walkway eventually connected it to the concrete dam. The dam at Lake Mineral Wells was raised because of the increased need for water due to the building of Camp Wolters and its expansion into the largest Infantry Replacement Training Center in the nation in World War II. The island was thereafter covered by water. Lake Mineral Wells eventually became partially filled with silt, and another water supply was sought. Palo Pinto Creek was dammed by the city In the mid 1960's to form Lake Palo Pinto, approximately ten miles southwest of the county seat of Palo Pinto County. It became the current source of Mineral Wells' municipal water supply. Lake Mineral Wells was donated to Texas Parks and Wildlife in 1980, and became the focal point of Lake Mineral Wells State Park. Due to its ...
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[Possum Kingdom Lake - Observation Point]

[Possum Kingdom Lake - Observation Point]

Date: August 11, 1974
Creator: unknown
Description: A view of part of Possum Kingdom Lake from Observation Point, taken August 11, 1974. Although it is not readily visible, the Morris Sheppard Dam, which impounds the Brazos River to form Possum Kingdom Lake, is on the far right edge of the picture. The view is from a vantage point approximately 150 feet above the water, which in its turn is approximately 190 feet deep at this point.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Middle Panel of the Oldest Known Panorama of Mineral Wells]

[The Middle Panel of the Oldest Known Panorama of Mineral Wells]

Date: 1882?
Creator: unknown
Description: Shown here is the middle photograph of three that are arranged on pages 40 and 41 of A. F. Weaver's book, "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells", to create the "Earliest known panoramic view of Mineral Wells around 1882." It was taken from East Mountain looking to the southwest. The photograph includes the center of today's [2008]downtown Mineral Wells. A large white two-story building is shown at the left center of the picture on West Hubbard Street, at the site of the (later) Southern Hotel. The building at the far left edge of the picture occupies on the site of the current Mineral Wells Fire and Police Departments in the 200 block of South Oak Avenue. The center of Mineral Wells' Business District is now [2008] the intersection of Oak Avenue (US 281) and Hubbard Street (US Highway 180).
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
We lost our job at Mineral Wells, Texas

We lost our job at Mineral Wells, Texas

Date: 1920?/1930?
Creator: unknown
Description: This is a picture that was found in Mr. Weaver's collection, and captioned "We lost our job at Mineral Wells, Texas." This type of advertising was used by most of the drinking pavilions in this popular health resort to tout the beneficial effects of Mineral Wells' waters. There were numerous testimonials attesting the truth of such claims. When the Food and Drug Administration began to enforce the nation's drug laws vigorously in the mid- 1930's, however, there were no rigorous scientific test data to document such claims or to warn of possible side effects that taking the mineral water might bring about. Consequently, this sort of advertising was banned after the 1930's.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
"Crazy Hotel Opens"

"Crazy Hotel Opens"

Date: March 10, 1994
Creator: A. F. Weaver
Description: CRAZY HOTEL OPENS: A program Presented by A.F. Weaver to the Mineral Wells Heritage Association March 10, 1994. [This is the first of ten pages, stapled at upper left-hand corner.] The text was probably computer-generated in 13-point sans-serif script and it is likely that Mr. Weaver began his program with a contemporary newspaper account of the gala opening of the re-built hotel. Certainly the opening of the significant hotel was a red-letter day in the history of Mineral Wells. A photocopy of a souvenir menu was laminated on the back of Mr. Weaver's prepared program.]
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library