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 Decade: 1930-1939
 Collection: A. F. Weaver Collection
The American Legion Drum and Bugle Corp at their 1933 Convention in Chicago
This much-decayed picture has obviously been pinned to a cork-board. Enough of the legend at its bottom survives to proclaim that the picture commemorates the attendance of the Drum and Bugle Corps of Mineral Wells' Fearis Anderson Post No. 75, at a national convention of the the American Legion, in Chicago, Illinois, on October 2-5, 1933. The photograph was taken, the legend states, compliments of the Majestic Hotel. Please note: The American Legion provided the following names to accompany the picture: David Burnswick,[sic] Director; Paul Grable, Drum Major; Tommie Burns, Trumpet; James W. Calvert, Trumpet; E.M. Davidson, Trumpet; Lawrence Davis, Trumpet; Sam Goldman, Trumpet; Jack Armstrong, Trumpet; Bob Echols,[sic] Clarinet; (?) Davidson, Clarinet; Lloyd Kendall, Clarinet; Bob Irvine, Clarinet; (?)Brady, Piccolo; Arly (?) Bolfour,[sic] S. Drums, B. Drums; Dan Raeffell,[sic] Bass; W.E. Davis, Bass; Roy Prince, Trombone; Vaughan Davis, Trombone; (?) Trombone; Franz Schubert, Baritone; Alex Pavlovsky, Horn; W. W. Woodward. Horn; George Oliver, Horn; Bill Chancellor, Color Bearer; W.H.H. Smith, Color Bearer; Allan Wallace, Color Guard; George Barber, Color Guard. This band was awarded a state championship three times. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16264/
[The Baker Hotel and the First Methodist Church]
This picture, showing Baker Hotel and the First Methodist Church, was taken approximately in 1938. The church, pictured here, shows a later second story to the building on the side of the church proper. It is known to be the second Methodist church on the site. Older photographs of its predecessor are at this time [2014] lacking. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39158/
[The Baker Hotel Entrance]
Shown here is the main entrance to the Baker Hotel, which went directly into the hotel lobby. Note individuals on the veranda that are standing as well as sitting in deck chairs. Cars are parked on East Hubbard St. (US Hwy 180). Some of the most famous (and some of the infamous) people have entered through this arcade. For example, Sam Goldwyn, Jean Harlow, Clark Gable, Sammy Kaye, Helen Keller, Clyde Barrow, Lyndon Johnson, Dr. Charles Mayo, Sam Rayburn, Tom Mix, Sophie Tucker, the Three Stooges, and Roy Rogers were all guests at the hotel at one time or another. This photograph was donated by Mrs. Guy Montgomery. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20223/
[Crazy Crystals]
Men and women are shown here packaging Crazy Water Crystals. Mineral water was evaporated, and the resulting crystal deposits were gathered and packaged in various sizes for shipment throughout the United States. Written on back of this photograph is: "Pkg Crazy Crystals 1930's" and the name "Buster." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29969/
Crazy Crystals in Parade 1936
This photograph shows two vehicles in the Crazy Crystals Parade in 1936. One of the vehicles (a van) is decorated with Crazy Crystals Shipping Boxes. It is covered with streamers on the hood, door handle, the running board, and all the tires--including its spare. The car following it is black with white panels in the doors. It also has streamers on the hood. Apart from the printed legend on the base of the photograph, there is no further information available about this photograph. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39220/
[Crazy Fiz]
Products were developed to satisfy the public's search for health during the heyday of the Mineral Wells Health Industry. One of these was Crazy Fiz. Carbon dioxide was infused into mineral water under pressure to create a "Sparkling water" drink labeled "Crazy Fiz." The women in this photograph of the Crazy Water Crystal plant are packaging the Crazy Fiz for distribution. On the back of the photograph is printed "Crazy Fiz 1930's." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29971/
[A Crazy Hotel Brochure]
This photograph illustrates a fold-out brochure of the Crazy Hotel with various scenic views of things to see and do around the city, along with different modes of transportation to and from Mineral Wells. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60934/
[ A Crazy Hotel Pamphlet]
No Description texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60932/
Crazy Park Entrance
Shown here is the entrance to Crazy Park, Mineral Wells, Texas, a picture taken in 1938. This park was earlier a part of the Gibson Pavilion and Park in the 700 block of NW 2nd Avenue. It was located a block south of the Crazy Water Crystals plant, built in 1919. The property now [2008] belongs to, and is occupied by, the First Christian Church. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29451/
Crazy Radio Theatre
According to A. F. Weaver, in his book "Time was in Mineral Wells", the Crazy Radio Theatre broadcast from the lobby of the Crazy Hotel in Mineral Wells over the Texas Quality Network. The show's origin is said to be the selling of "Crazy Water Crystals." Identified are Hal Collins (Manager of the Crazy Hotel), Paul, Ludy, Dick, Jake, Slim. [No last names are given.] Please note the early 12-string steel guitar held by Paul. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth24991/
[Crazy Sign]
This picture, looking east with the Baker Hotel in the background, of the Crazy Hotel sign was colorized by Mr. A.F. Weaver. The Crazy Sign was constructed in 1933 in the center of Mineral Wells and spanned Hubbard Street (US 180) at its intersection with Oak Avenue It was quite a landmark, as it was one of only two signs allowed by the Texas Department of Transportation to cross a highway maintained by the State. The sign was torn down on December 24, 1958. The urgency of its removal during the Holiday Season was never explained; nor was it ever quite understood by the general public. It was sold for scrap some time later. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25066/
Crazy Sign Across 100 Block Hubbard Street
This picture shows a post-card of the sign. It also represents the original version of the picture of the Crazy Sign. A colorized version, by A. F. Weaver, may be found under the title [Crazy Sign]. It was constructed in 1933 over East Hubbard Street, (later to become part of the Bankhead Highway--later still, US Highway 180) in the center of Mineral Wells. It was quite a landmark ss it was one of only two signs allowed by by the Texas Department of Transportation to span a highway maintained by the state agency. The sign was torn down on December 24, 1958 (No explanation was offered for the rush to remove it on Christmas Eve.) It was later salvaged for scrap. Information about it was taken from A.F. Weavers "Time Was...", on page 30. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29964/
[The Crazy Water Bottling Company]
A note on back of this photograph states, "Crazy Fiz, 1930's." It apparently shows a section of the Crazy Water Bottling Company, where carbonation of the mineral water converted it to a "Crazy Fiz", a product similar to the popular carbonated soft drinks of the day. It was also bottled and packaged for shipment here. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29447/
[Crazy Water Company Railroad Cars]
Men are shown here loading boxes of Crazy Crystals onto railroad boxcars. Crazy Water Crystals were shipped nationwide in response to demand created by radio advertising. This scene is typical of the activity required to load boxcars to meet the demand for "instant Mineral Water." Printed on back of the photograph is: "Loading Crazy Crystals 1930." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29972/
[Crystal Plant]
A picture of the Crystal Production Line is shown here. On the back of the photograph is typed: CRYSTALS WERE THEN PACKED INTO GREEN AND WHITE BOXES AND RUN DOWN THE CONVEYOR WHERE GIRLS PLACED THE LIDS. AT THE END OF THE BELT A MACHINE WRAPPED THE BOX IN CELLOPHANE. PHOTO 1930 texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29820/
[Drinking Pavilion in the Crazy Hotel]
A caption on the back of the photograph states, "This picture, taken in the 1930's, shows the drinking pavilion in the [lacuna] Crazy Hotel." Recognizable are Boyce Ditto, standing third from right; N.E. Adams, last on the right, standing reading a newspaper; and Mrs. Veale, mother of Cecil Young, seated on left. Many people came to Mineral Wells to bathe and to "Drink their way to health" at the many wells and pavilions that catered to the public. This drinking pavilion is still extant, just off the lobby of the "Crazy" (now [2008] a retirement home), but it no longer dispenses mineral water. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25069/
[The Entrance to Camp Wolters]
Found on page 158 of "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells" by A. F. Weaver, the caption to this picture reads, "Entrance to the original Camp Wolters around the 1930's. This entrance was located near and behind the present National Guard Armory." The Texas National Guard 112th Cavalry Service Troop maintained an armory on West Mountain, from a time before 1923. The hill itself was dubbed "Cavalry Hill." The Service Troop was later re-named 124th Cavalry, Troop F--which attained to fame as part of the task force that cleared the Burma Road in World War II. Camp Wolters was built for summer training of the Texas National Guard in 1927. It was to be used for a minimum of three weeks each year. The famous CCC (The Civilian Conservation Corps) stayed in the camp in 1930, and built several of the rock structures in the camp--and also around Mineral Wells. The original site had sen many uses: It was a P.O.W. camp for German prisoners taken during World War II; it was Texas National Guard property; and it was later given over to commercial use. An embedded star that was once on the headquarters of the parade ground of the original camp (now on the propery of Mineral Wells High School) is still visited by those who were stationed there--and by those World War II prisoners who were interned in Mineral Wells. The Texas Historical Commission recognizes its significance with a marker. The "new" Camp Wolters was located farther east in 1941. It has also had many uses: The U.S. Army IRTC; (Infantry Replacement Training Center) in World War II; Wolters Air Force Base in the early 1950's. It was returned to the army in 1956, and re-named Fort Wolters in 1963. It was the U.S. Army Primary Helicopter School (USAPHS)during the Vietnam War in 1966. The entrance to the original Camp Wolters was constructed of native sandstone with red-clay-tile roofs. Part of the property was distributed to Mineral Wells and Weatherford after Fort Wolters was decommissioned following the Vietnam War. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth38085/
Famous Mineral Water
The Famous Water Company, founded by Ed Dismuke (still located at 215 NW 6th Street) has been restored, and still [2007] sells mineral water. The large concrete bottle depicts the original shape of the container of the product sold. Dismuke also established a plant on the east bank of Lake Pinto, west of Mineral Wells, to manufacture his "PRONTO-LAX" Crystals. He organized the Mineral Wells Lakewood Scenic Railway in partnership with local banker Cicero Smith, whose gasoline-powered "Dinky Cars" operated quarter-hourly between Lake Pinto and Mineral Wells from 1905 to 1909. The Famous Water Company currently sells three grades of water: Regular, full-strength mineral water; deep (400 ft.) well water; and deep-well water that has been ionized and filtered by reverse osmosis. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth24958/
[Fishing at Lake Mineral Wells]
Fishermen stand below a cataract of the spillway of Lake Mineral Wells. The photograph was taken in 1938. On the reverse of the picture is the and-written legend: Picture taken by A. F. Weaver. This picture is featured in "Time Was in Mineral Wells...." on page 112. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39229/
[Four golfers at Mineral Wells Country Club - 1930's]
Four unidentified men in golfing knickers (apparently from the early 1930's) stand in front of, and across the lake from the original Holiday Hills Country Club house. They are putting on what is now the Number 12 green. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16253/
[The Grande Courts]
A tourist court, built about 1930 by Charlie E. Turner, Harold Dennis, and Clarence Hunt is depicted here. It was located in the 1000 block of West Hubbard Street. Grande [pronounced "Grand-dee"--at least in Mineral Wells] Courts was a national chain of franchise motels. This picture appears in A.F. Weaver's book, "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells", second edition, page 99. The sign reads "Grande Courts Tourist Apts." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20429/
[A Group of men at Inspiration Point]
A group of businessmen and ranchers are shown at Inspiration Point in the 1920's. From left, they are (unknown); Mr. Henry Penix; Mr. Bowman; Mssrs. Henry and Charlie Fowler. Note the spurs on the boots of the Fowlers, and the cigars in the hands of Mssrs. Penix and Bowman. Inspiration Point, overlooking the Brazos in Southeast Palo Pinto County about ten miles south of Mineral Wells, commands a vast panoramic view of the rugged river valley stretching for miles below the viewer. It was a noted scenic attraction during the heyday of one of America's most popular health resorts. It is not available to the general public at this time, as it is located on private property. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth24952/
[Inside of the Crazy Water Bottling Plant]
Handwriting on the back of this photograph identifies it as "Crazy Fiz 1930s" It is a section of the Crazy Water Bottling Plant, where carbon dioxide appears to have been added to the mineral water in order to compete with the popular soft drinks of the era. Note the bottling machine in the right foreground of the picture. Women are packing the carbonated "fizz water" for shipment. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29448/
A Jinricksha
Notes that accompany the photograph read: "Picture taken near the top of the thousand steps which used to climb East Mountain up NE 3rd Street. Path can still be seen going up the side of the mountain at this point." The souvenir picture was taken in the 1930's, and is believed to have been taken at the photographer's cabin, where the winding donkey trail formerly crossed the steps. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20462/
[A Lion's Club Christmas Project]
A note by A.F. Weaver identifies this group as "Left to right: Lions, Cary Lodal, Moon Mullins, Charlie Johnson, "Santa Claus", Jess Pervine, Noble Glenn." The last four are pictured as sitting on the running board of a General Motors truck, which appears to be loaded with wrapped gifts. (No connection is known or implied, but since the "Santa Claus" in the picture is not identified, an interesting bit of local history is offered by way of suppletion: Rancher Charley Belding, a bachelor living west of Palo Pinto, was known annually to contribute (anonymously) truckloads of Christmas Gifts for needy children in the county.) Note the Hexagon Hotel in the upper right corner and the two gasoline stations, Gulf and Sinclair (H.C.) The picture appears to have been taken on the east side of N. Oak Avenue in about the 500 block. The Lion's club, mentioned in the title, is a service organization. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25064/
[The Lions Club Womanless Wedding]
Pictured here is the Lion's Club "Woman-less Wedding", a Community Entertainment Production sponsored by the local Lion's Club as a fund-raiser for local charity, and popular around the 1930's and 1940's. Participants are identified as: Seated; J. B. Courtney (Miss Fortitude), Charles Williams and Noble Glenn (Miss Applied). Standing; Cary Lodal, Dr. Holder, Bob Joiner, Jess Purvine, Cecil Young, Charlie Johnson and Frank Burney (Mae West). texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth38076/
Methodist Church - Baker Gardens - East Mountain
This photograph appears to be taken from a picture post-card, which includes the old Methodist Church, the Baker Hotel Garden, the Baker Water Storage Building, and the Welcome Sign on East Mountain. It is a rare view. The home of Druggist Dr. C. F. Yeager on NE 2nd Street in the picture was still standing at the time of this picture. During construction of his Hotel, Mr. Baker visited Hot Springs, Arkansas; and he was so impressed with the Arlington Hotel that he stopped building construction, and moved the hotel a block further west. He converted the basement, already built, into a swimming pool (only the second hotel known to have a pool at the time), and an underground laundry. The Methodist church has since been rebuilt, the water storage building has been removed, and the "Welcome" sign has been relocated further east to greet visitors from its new location overlooking Elmwood Cemetery. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29980/
[The Milling Sanatorium]
Dr. H. H. Milling was the first of Mineral Wells' "rubbin' doctors." He operated the Mineral Wells Sanatorium at 315 NW 1st Avenue before building this sanitarium in the 2500 block of SE 6th Avenue - the old Millsap Highway) about 1929. The building was later sold and renamed Irvine Sanitarium. It now [2010] belongs to the Veterans of Foreign Wars, is located at 1400 SE VFW Highway (a branch of SE 6th Avenue), and houses VFW Post 2399. Dr. Milling also owned 60 acres on Pollard Creek in north Mineral Wells that were donated to the state of Texas to use as a State Park, which became SP8. During the Great Depression of the 1930's, the WPA and the CCC made several additions to that park to improve its recreational value: Bridges, a small dam, steps up the mountain, restrooms, etc., all using native sandstone. When Milling Park was determined by the state to be surplus property, it was deeded to the city and later renamed North City Park. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth24950/
[The Mineral Wells Mounted Police]
A copy of a newspaper clipping, the caption identifies members of the Mineral Wells Mounted Police "57 years ago." Identified are: "Uncle Billy Wood" on his white horse (not a member of the force); Bob Pate; Paul Craig; Jim Barrett, probably Chief of Police at the time; Paul Granbury. All are reported to be deceased at time of printing. The picture was furnished to the paper courtesy Mrs. Paul Granbury. The sign on the building at the far left of the picture has been tentatively identified as a Livery Stable. Though the sign is visible, the distance has made its contents extremely obscure. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth38082/
[A Panoramic View of Lake Mineral Wells]
An early panoramic view of Lake Mineral Wells is illustrated here. The lake was built by the city of Mineral Wells for a municipal water supply in 1920. Rock Creek, in Parker County, was dammed to impound a lake approximately one mile wide and five miles long. An island, visible in the center of this picture, was initially accessible only by boat; but a wooden walkway eventually connected it to the concrete dam. The dam at Lake Mineral Wells was raised because of the increased need for water due to the building of Camp Wolters and its expansion into the largest Infantry Replacement Training Center in the nation in World War II. The island was thereafter covered by water. Lake Mineral Wells eventually became partially filled with silt, and another water supply was sought. Palo Pinto Creek was dammed by the city In the mid 1960's to form Lake Palo Pinto, approximately ten miles southwest of the county seat of Palo Pinto County. It became the current source of Mineral Wells' municipal water supply. Lake Mineral Wells was donated to Texas Parks and Wildlife in 1980, and became the focal point of Lake Mineral Wells State Park. Due to its proximity to the Dallas-Ft. Worth Metroplex, Lake Mineral Wells State Park is one of the more popular State Parks in Texas. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth38090/
[The Road to Mineral Wells]
The 1936 opening of the brick highway from Mineral Wells to Weatherford, now known as Highway US 180. This was a Works Project Administration (WPA) highway, built during the early "Great Depression" recovery period. The photograph is looking west toward Mineral Wells, and the Baker Hotel may be seen faintly on the horizon at left center of the picture. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20466/
Sewerage Disposal Plant
Mineral Wells' Sewerage Disposal Plant was built on the site of the former Elmhurst Park on Pollard Creek, approximately 2 miles SSW of the city. The city obtained the park property, and built the sewerage treatment plant during the recovery from the Great Depression of the 1930's. Shown here is a photograph of a clipping from a newspaper. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25102/
Sewing Room
The back of the photograph exhibits a note that this picture was copied from the "Burro", which is the Mineral Wells High School yearbook. The "Sewing Room" was a classroom in the Lillian Peek Home Economics building on the grounds of the high school. The Lillian Peek cottage was built by the WPA in 1937, and was the first free- standing house built specifically for Home Economics education in the State of Texas. It was "Current state of the art" when it was completed. The building now houses the Creative Arts Center, and is used by the local Art Club as an art workshop and museum. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25050/
[A Supervisor at the Crazy Bottling/Crystals Plant]
Identifying information on this photograph is lacking, but it appears to portray a supervisor in the Crazy Bottling/Crystals Plant catching up on the paperwork produced by a day's business. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29411/
View of Mineral Wells from East Mountain Showing Crazy Hotel & Nazareth Hospital
A view of Mineral Wells from East Mountain, looking West-Northwest is shown here. The Crazy Hotel is visible in the near-left part of the picture, and the Nazareth Hospital in the middle-left, a block Northwest of the Crazy The Norwood Clinic (with its stately white columns), a block northeast of the Nazareth, is located near the center of the picture. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29450/
[The Womanless Theater]
This is apparently the picture of a picture of a fund-raiser performed by the Lion's Club. It consisted of a play in which men all played the roles of women. Identified (in print) are the three "ladies" in front: J. B Courtney (Miss Fortune), Charles Williams, and Noble Glenn (Miss Applied). Also identified (in holograph) is Cecil Young, third from the right, presumably among the standing "ladies." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth24984/