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  Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
 Decade: 1970-1979
 Collection: A. F. Weaver Collection
[Dedication of W.P (Bill) Cameron Mounument:  Sen. Tom Creighton Speaks]

[Dedication of W.P (Bill) Cameron Mounument: Sen. Tom Creighton Speaks]

Date: April 14, 1978
Creator: Weaver, A. F.
Description: Texas State Senator Tom Creighton delivers the keynote address at the dedication of a memorial marker to W.P. (Bill) Cameron at the "Little Rock Schoolhouse" Museum. Mr. Cameron was the Editor of the Mineral Wells Index newspaper, and an active and popular participant in local civic and social events. After his death, his family placed a marker in his honor at the museum. Members of Mr. Cameron's family are seated to the speaker's left, and the Junior High Ensamble, Director Vicki Carden, are on the museum steps behind and to the speaker's right, Please contact the collection webmaster if you recognize other persons in the picture. The marker has been removed, and its location iss not known at this time.[see previous photographs for more details.] Very dimly visible in an enlarged photo, inside the open door of the museum, is an original five-pointedwooden star that decorated a gable of the historic Hexagon House Hotel.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Demolition of the Convention Hall--1 of 5:   Front View]

[The Demolition of the Convention Hall--1 of 5: Front View]

Date: 1975
Creator: A. F. Weaver
Description: The metal framework of the Mineral Wells Convention Hall is all that it readily visible during its demolition in 1975/1976. Built on the rock foundation of the Hexagon House Electric Plant (for the West Texas Chamber of Commerce Convention in 1925), it served as the site of numerous local functions including High School Graduation Exercises. The landmark Hexagon Hotel, Mineral Wells' first electrically-lighted hotel, stood on the vacant corner lot in the left foreground of this picture from 1897 to 1959.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Demolition of the Convention Hall, 2 of 5:  From a Block Away]

[The Demolition of the Convention Hall, 2 of 5: From a Block Away]

Date: 1975
Creator: A. F. Weaver
Description: This photograph was taken at an early stage of the demolition of the Mineral Wells Convention Hall on N. Oak Avenue. Built in 1925 to accommodate the West Texas Chamber of Commerce Convention, it was constructed on the rock foundation of the Hexagon Hotel's electric power plant. The Hexagon Hotel, Mineral Wells' first electrically-lighted hotel, stood on the vacant corner lot in the foreground of this picture. It was torn down in 1959. When the Convention Hall was torn down in 1975, a member of the demolition crew said the new owner of the former London Bridge (to be re-erected at Havasu City in Arizona)was interested in acquiring the rocks to build the foundation for a fort to be constructed at the same site. (One local story credits that interest in the foundation stones as the reason for the demolition of the Convention Hall.)
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Demolition of the Convention Hall, 4 of 5]

[The Demolition of the Convention Hall, 4 of 5]

Date: 1976
Creator: unknown
Description: A holograph legend on the back of this picture states: "Tearing down Convention Hall 1976." The photograph illustrates the demolition of the building in full swing. Only the skeleton of the roof remains, and the walls are in ruins. This picture appears in Weaver's "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells" on page 186.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Fire at the Sangcura-Sprudel Well Building]

[The Fire at the Sangcura-Sprudel Well Building]

Date: December 5, 1973
Creator: unknown
Description: The Sangcura-Sprudel Well, located at 800 NW 2nd Avenue, was built around 1900. The building was later moved to 314 NW 5th Street, and the porches were enclosed. It was then re-modeled into a rooming house. The building burned down on December 5, 1973, five minutes before the annual Christmas Parade in Mineral Wells.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
First National Bank

First National Bank

Date: 1970?
Creator: unknown
Description: The first National Bank, at the SE corner of Oak Avenue and Hubbard Street in Mineral Wells, was originally located in the Oxford Hotel. The Lynch Building and Plaza were built on the site of the hotel, commemorating the location of the discovery of mineral water with "miracle healing powers" by a well drilled here by James A. Lynch in 1879, after the Oxford burned in 1983.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[A House at 401 NW 4th Avenue]

[A House at 401 NW 4th Avenue]

Date: June 1974
Creator: A. F. Weaver
Description: A home at 401 NW 4th Avenue taken June 1974 is illustrated here. The house was built by P.E. Bock, in what appears to be Colonial Revival style.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[A House at 401 NW 4th Avenue]

[A House at 401 NW 4th Avenue]

Date: June 1974
Creator: A. F. Weaver
Description: This picture gives a better view of the house shown in the previous photograph. It was taken in June of 1974. The house was built by P.E. Bock.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[A House at 1004 SW 10th Street]

[A House at 1004 SW 10th Street]

Date: June 1974
Creator: unknown
Description: This photograph affords a wider view of the house shown in the previous picture. It is of eclectic style, with Prairie, and Neoclassical elements. A telephone book dated 1940 lists it as the address of Alvin Maddox.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[Jarmon Alvis Lynch and wife]

[Jarmon Alvis Lynch and wife]

Date: October 1, 1977
Creator: A. F. Weaver
Description: A photograph of Jarmon Alvis Lynch and his wife, taken October 1, 1977. He was the grandson J. A. Lynch, the founder of Mineral Wells. He is shown standing on the steps of the Rock School House (in Mineral Wells)in this 1977 photograph, and holding his drawing of the Lynch cabins, which also shows the drilling rig his grandfather used to dig the first mineral well.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library